locked Outlook 2010 Issues with 2020.4 release, Windows 7


Marcia Yale
 

My message lists are no longer reading and NVDA gets stuck on the dictionary
name in the spellcheck. Has anyone else encountered this problem?

Marcia Yale
It is not our differences that divide us. It is our inability to recognize,
accept, and celebrate those differences.
Audre Lorde


Jackie
 

Marcia, please remember that Outlook 2010 and Windows 7 are no longer
supported. As such, newer versions of NVDA may not support these
either, and you may find yourself needing to use older versions to
maintain that functionality.

On 2/19/21, Marcia Yale <dragoncatmc@gmail.com> wrote:
My message lists are no longer reading and NVDA gets stuck on the
dictionary
name in the spellcheck. Has anyone else encountered this problem?

Marcia Yale
It is not our differences that divide us. It is our inability to recognize,
accept, and celebrate those differences.
Audre Lorde









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Jackie,

            Absolutely correct.  And while I have no issue at all with any member soliciting information about whether others are having sudden issues with software they've been using forever, even if it's out of support, the only thing further to say is, "You need to update."

             The group rules about this are very, very clear:
------

Unsupported versions of any software may only be discussed on the Chat Subgroup, not the main NVDA Group. 

Windows:  Only Windows 8.1 and currently supported versions of Windows 10.  Members should refer to the Windows Lifecycle Fact Sheet to determine which versions of Windows are currently supported.  Information about the dates on which specific versions of Windows 10 reached or will reach their end of service dates is listed there as well and will be updated as new versions are released. 

Note that it is acceptable to direct a user to the NVAccess or Microsoft sites where older versions can be downloaded, however, this is different than supporting a specific version of software or operating system.

NVDA:  NVDA has, at any given time, a single version under active support.  If a question arises about how to update to that version, and you’re on an earlier version, that will be permitted as transition problems can occasionally occur.

------

Those rules exist simply because there is a certain contingent of users (and I am not saying that Marcia is among them, because I don't know that, but we've all seen 'em) that simply will not accept two things:

1. All software has a finite service life.

2. It is entirely unreasonable to expect perpetual backward compatibility from any piece of software.  This is even more true now in the era of "Software As A Service," and it's not just Windows 10 that falls into that broad category.  The release schedule for NVDA has had that be what it is, in essence, for some time now.

We're now almost six years in to the Windows 10 era, and Windows 7 is officially completely out of support.  The Windows ecosystem is now the Windows 10 (with some Windows 8.1, but the writing's on the wall now for it, too) ecosystem, period.

It is essential that folks keep their systems up to date, and I have had one, and only one, Windows 7 machine that couldn't update to Windows 10, and that was due to the graphics hardware maker refusing to create a compatible driver.  Everything else would have happily gone along.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

Any idiot can face a crisis. It's the day-to-day living that wears you out.

      ~ Anton Chekhov

 


Luke Robinett <blindgroupsluke@...>
 

Wow. People still use Windows 7?

On Feb 19, 2021, at 9:52 AM, Marcia Yale <dragoncatmc@gmail.com> wrote:

My message lists are no longer reading and NVDA gets stuck on the dictionary
name in the spellcheck. Has anyone else encountered this problem?

Marcia Yale
It is not our differences that divide us. It is our inability to recognize,
accept, and celebrate those differences.
Audre Lorde









 

On Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 10:57 PM, Luke Robinett wrote:
Wow. People still use Windows 7?
-
Not to mention Office 2010.  From the End of Support for Office 2010 Page:
Support for Office 2010 ended on October 13, 2020 and there will be no extension and no extended security updates. All of your Office 2010 apps will continue to function. However, you could expose yourself to serious and potentially harmful security risks.

There is a reason that the NVDA Group Rules state, very clearly:
-------

Unsupported versions of any software may only be discussed on the Chat Subgroup, not the main NVDA Group. 

Windows:  Only Windows 8.1 and currently supported versions of Windows 10.  Members should refer to the Windows Lifecycle Fact Sheet to determine which versions of Windows are currently supported.  Information about the dates on which specific versions of Windows 10 reached or will reach their end of service dates is listed there as well and will be updated as new versions are released. 

Note that it is acceptable to direct a user to the NVAccess or Microsoft sites where older versions can be downloaded, however, this is different than supporting a specific version of software or operating system.

NVDA:  NVDA has, at any given time, a single version under active support.  If a question arises about how to update to that version, and you’re on an earlier version, that will be permitted as transition problems can occasionally occur.

-------

We are now just short of six years into the era of Windows 10.  Windows 7 is officially out of support.  It is still possible to do an in-place upgrade, at no cost, from Windows 7 or 8.1 to Windows 10.  For those still on Windows 7, that's precisely what they should do.  If you intend to stay in the Windows ecosystem you do not, under any circumstances, use an out-of-support version of that operating system that no longer receives security updates.

The same is true of MS-Office as well.  The most dangerous period is generally the first full year after the date a given version goes out of support, because that's when those who wish to hack have a field day trying to find as-yet-undiscovered vulnerabilities that can then be exploited without any chance of patching.

There are free alternatives to MS-Office and many email clients as well as webmail.  There is a free path to the currently supported version of Windows.  Those options should be accessed when needed, and anyone still using Windows 7 needs to get off of it.

And the quotation of the rules is there so I can emphasize that I will be monitoring, and enforcing same.  If you have chosen to use out-of-support software that is your choice.  But what isn't is trying to discuss it on the NVDA group.  The Chat Subgroup is available, or some other venue.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

Any idiot can face a crisis. It's the day-to-day living that wears you out.

      ~ Anton Chekhov

 


Lukasz Golonka
 

Hello,

Could you please download a test build from
https://ci.appveyor.com/api/buildjobs/1kquwbwrsc3ul2fr/artifacts/output%2Fnvda_snapshot_pr12241-22163%2C6a6d9c46.exe
check if the messages list is once again readable and report back?

--
Regards
Lukasz


 

I have no objections to anyone attempting to assist anyone else with an issue, but in the appropriate venue.

If there is a need to discuss this further, it should occur either on the NVDA Chat Subgroup or elsewhere.  We're talking about two out of support pieces of software:  Outlook 2010 and Windows 7, which is in direct violation of the written group rules.  I cut a break earlier, but that break is over.

This topic is now locked.  If it needs to be continued, it needs to be continued somewhere else. 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

Always remember others may hate you but those who hate you don't win unless you hate them.  And then you destroy yourself.

       ~ Richard M. Nixon