Topics

moderated RAM Problem with Dell computers that have Realtek HD Audio Driver, and NVDA or JAWS


William
 

Hi,

The issue here was first discussed within the Win 10 mailing list.


I bought a new Dell desktop and I found that after using for several minutes the ram was abnormally behaved, i.e. without using much of a ram consuming program, the ram is almost full.


The Dell technical, pointed out that the Windows Grapth Audio isolation was the process that caused the problem.


But actually it is not, many thanks to Luke who pointed out to me that after changing the sound driver from Realtech HD Audio to Windows default Windows HD audio, and the ram issue has gone.

I want to bring this issue to your attention, seeing if this is a nvda issue?  if so I will make a issue on github.


Thanks,

William


luke scholey
 

Hi all

 

Just to add to this:

 

There seems to be an issue with some (but not all) new Dell laptops that use a version of the Realtech audio driver and NVDA.

 

As stated below, there’s a memory leak with the Windows Audio Device Graph Isolation (audiodg.exe) service. When using NVDA, especially for long periods of time, this service eats all available ram and then starts gobbling up virtual memory as well until the device blue screens. This is limited to when NVDA speaks, my testing has revealed that if you leave NVDA silent for a while, the memory slowly comes back down again. This leak also doesn’t happen when other audio is playing so it seems to be a problem with the way NVDA uses this service. But if you’re using one of these effected laptops in a 9 til 5  job, over a few hours, the machine would become slower and slower.

 

A temporary fix for this is to find the audio driver in use in the device manager from hardware and sound, navigate to the sounds video and game controllers category and update the audio driver. Instead of searching for updates on the internet automatically, choose the manual option and select the button that will allow the user to choose a driver from a compatible list of drivers in the same category. Usually there will only be two drivers in this list, the current Realtech driver and the default Windows 10 driver which is called HD Audio from Microsoft. Click this driver to update and the audio on the machine will stop. Restart the laptop to begin using the new updated driver. Using this HD Audio driver, the issue is no longer present.

 

I’m not saying NVDA is at fault here because I don’t know enough about this yet. It could be that the driver is the culprit, and NVDA is doing things correctly but the driver is not handling NVDA very well.

 

So far I’ve tested this on Dell Inspiron laptops from the 570 range and above, from Windows 10 1809 and above and NVDA 2019.1 and above.

 

Hope this helps.

 

Luke

 

 

From: William Wong
Sent: 30 November 2020 11:19
To: nvda@groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Ram problem and nvda

 

H

 


 

I have had the same issue with my Dell laptop that I got in September for school. This happens Withjaws or NVDA. I would love the instructions please because it does this to me in word or just using a browser and I would love to avoid sending in my laptop once the semester is over to get it fixed.

Melissa

On Nov 30, 2020, at 5:19 AM, William Wong <sine.kazurin@gmail.com> wrote:

Hi,

The issue here was first discussed within the Win 10 mailing list.


I bought a new Dell desktop and I found that after using for several minutes the ram was abnormally behaved, i.e. without using much of a ram consuming program, the ram is almost full.


The Dell technical, pointed out that the Windows Grapth Audio isolation was the process that caused the problem.


But actually it is not, many thanks to Luke who pointed out to me that after changing the sound driver from Realtech HD Audio to Windows default Windows HD audio, and the ram issue has gone.

I want to bring this issue to your attention, seeing if this is a nvda issue? if so I will make a issue on github.


Thanks,

William






luke scholey
 

Hi Melissa

I know how annoying this can be. See my message below for instructions on how to sort it.

Let me know if you need anymore detailed steps.

All the best
Luke



On 30 Nov 2020, at 12:17, luke scholey via groups.io <l.scholey@...> wrote:



Hi all

 

Just to add to this:

 

There seems to be an issue with some (but not all) new Dell laptops that use a version of the Realtech audio driver and NVDA.

 

As stated below, there’s a memory leak with the Windows Audio Device Graph Isolation (audiodg.exe) service. When using NVDA, especially for long periods of time, this service eats all available ram and then starts gobbling up virtual memory as well until the device blue screens. This is limited to when NVDA speaks, my testing has revealed that if you leave NVDA silent for a while, the memory slowly comes back down again. This leak also doesn’t happen when other audio is playing so it seems to be a problem with the way NVDA uses this service. But if you’re using one of these effected laptops in a 9 til 5  job, over a few hours, the machine would become slower and slower.

 

A temporary fix for this is to find the audio driver in use in the device manager from hardware and sound, navigate to the sounds video and game controllers category and update the audio driver. Instead of searching for updates on the internet automatically, choose the manual option and select the button that will allow the user to choose a driver from a compatible list of drivers in the same category. Usually there will only be two drivers in this list, the current Realtech driver and the default Windows 10 driver which is called HD Audio from Microsoft. Click this driver to update and the audio on the machine will stop. Restart the laptop to begin using the new updated driver. Using this HD Audio driver, the issue is no longer present.

 

I’m not saying NVDA is at fault here because I don’t know enough about this yet. It could be that the driver is the culprit, and NVDA is doing things correctly but the driver is not handling NVDA very well.

 

So far I’ve tested this on Dell Inspiron laptops from the 570 range and above, from Windows 10 1809 and above and NVDA 2019.1 and above.

 

Hope this helps.

 

Luke

 

 

From: William Wong
Sent: 30 November 2020 11:19
To: nvda@groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Ram problem and nvda

 

H

 


 

Luke,

         In this situation, you've pretty much effectively eliminated NVDA from the equation.  If NVDA were the source of the problem it should occur regardless of the device drivers in place.  Memory leaks, much like fluid leaks, have sources, and if you patch a given source and the leaking stops entirely, you know the culprit.

         Also note that Melissa states that she has the issue with either JAWS or NVDA, which points even more toward something external to either one of those programs as being the root cause.

         I hope someone reports these findings to Dell.  Many manufacturers, and Dell is one of them, customize device drivers provided by the actual hardware manufacturers to their own liking.  I've got Realtek audio drivers on several machines and have never encountered this issue either with JAWS or NVDA.  The finger is pointing directly at Dell and some tweak(s) they've made to the audio drivers they supply with their machines.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

If you think that you can think about a thing, inextricably attached to something else, without thinking of the thing it is attached to, then you have a legal mind.

        ~ Thomas Reed Powell

 


 

By the way, I have updated the title of this topic for archival purposes.  This situation is very limited in scope and requires a specific combination of computer brand, Dell, and audio drivers (probably customized), Realtek, in order for the issue to occur.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

If you think that you can think about a thing, inextricably attached to something else, without thinking of the thing it is attached to, then you have a legal mind.

        ~ Thomas Reed Powell

 


luke scholey
 

I agree, good point raised. But I don’t want to automatically exclude NVDA or a 3rd party component that it uses unless I can prove it is dell. What if a tweak could be made within NVDA that detects this driver and fixes the leak. After all, anyone could find The source of the leak and fix it themselves if they know how, and have the appropriate access.

I think if it were possible to fix, we have better luck with NVAccess taking it seriously than dell.

Thanks also for updating the title.

All the best
Luke



On 30 Nov 2020, at 15:39, Brian Vogel <britechguy@...> wrote:

Luke,

         In this situation, you've pretty much effectively eliminated NVDA from the equation.  If NVDA were the source of the problem it should occur regardless of the device drivers in place.  Memory leaks, much like fluid leaks, have sources, and if you patch a given source and the leaking stops entirely, you know the culprit.

         Also note that Melissa states that she has the issue with either JAWS or NVDA, which points even more toward something external to either one of those programs as being the root cause.

         I hope someone reports these findings to Dell.  Many manufacturers, and Dell is one of them, customize device drivers provided by the actual hardware manufacturers to their own liking.  I've got Realtek audio drivers on several machines and have never encountered this issue either with JAWS or NVDA.  The finger is pointing directly at Dell and some tweak(s) they've made to the audio drivers they supply with their machines.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

If you think that you can think about a thing, inextricably attached to something else, without thinking of the thing it is attached to, then you have a legal mind.

        ~ Thomas Reed Powell

 


 

On Mon, Nov 30, 2020 at 11:17 AM, luke scholey wrote:
I think if it were possible to fix, we have better luck with NVAccess taking it seriously than dell.
-
That's just not the way it does, or should, work.

If the problem is with a driver, then whoever is responsible for that driver does the fix.  It is conceivably possible it could be Realtek, but I'm doubting it since the problem has so far been confined only to Dell machines.

If third party software developers like NVAccess and others were ever to get into the business of creating workarounds for driver issues or memory leak issues of any kind not of their making their ability to focus on their core missions would evaporate very, very quickly.

There are spheres of responsibility in the software world that are pretty clearly demarcated and have been since the days I was actually doing it, which ended in the late 1990s.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

If you think that you can think about a thing, inextricably attached to something else, without thinking of the thing it is attached to, then you have a legal mind.

        ~ Thomas Reed Powell

 


 

Thank you for this, this was driving me crazy. It would do this to me if I were using jaws or NVDA. I have been contacting Microsoft support and even della couple of times and they couldn’t help me… dell hung up on me twice. to me, it sounded like a memory issue but I couldn’t figure out what was taking up that memory. Nothing says fun like working on a paper for school, hitting save, hearing it saved, and then finding out that it didn’t save your work for the past half hour.
I have a dell latitude that I got back in September of this year.

Melissa

On Nov 30, 2020, at 6:17 AM, luke scholey via groups.io <l.scholey@...> wrote:



Hi all

 

Just to add to this:

 

There seems to be an issue with some (but not all) new Dell laptops that use a version of the Realtech audio driver and NVDA.

 

As stated below, there’s a memory leak with the Windows Audio Device Graph Isolation (audiodg.exe) service. When using NVDA, especially for long periods of time, this service eats all available ram and then starts gobbling up virtual memory as well until the device blue screens. This is limited to when NVDA speaks, my testing has revealed that if you leave NVDA silent for a while, the memory slowly comes back down again. This leak also doesn’t happen when other audio is playing so it seems to be a problem with the way NVDA uses this service. But if you’re using one of these effected laptops in a 9 til 5  job, over a few hours, the machine would become slower and slower.

 

A temporary fix for this is to find the audio driver in use in the device manager from hardware and sound, navigate to the sounds video and game controllers category and update the audio driver. Instead of searching for updates on the internet automatically, choose the manual option and select the button that will allow the user to choose a driver from a compatible list of drivers in the same category. Usually there will only be two drivers in this list, the current Realtech driver and the default Windows 10 driver which is called HD Audio from Microsoft. Click this driver to update and the audio on the machine will stop. Restart the laptop to begin using the new updated driver. Using this HD Audio driver, the issue is no longer present.

 

I’m not saying NVDA is at fault here because I don’t know enough about this yet. It could be that the driver is the culprit, and NVDA is doing things correctly but the driver is not handling NVDA very well.

 

So far I’ve tested this on Dell Inspiron laptops from the 570 range and above, from Windows 10 1809 and above and NVDA 2019.1 and above.

 

Hope this helps.

 

Luke

 

 

From: William Wong
Sent: 30 November 2020 11:19
To: nvda@groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Ram problem and nvda

 

H

 


 

On Mon, Nov 30, 2020 at 11:59 AM, Melissa Jean wrote:
dell hung up on me twice.
-
That's something I would report, too, unless you were behaving in an outrageously abusive way toward the support tech, which I highly doubt you were.

This is clearly something that Dell needs to be in the center of resolving, and they need to pick up the ball.

After having read Mr. Wong's saga elsewhere before this topic started, coupled with what's been shared here, I would be raising holy hell with Dell about this and not taking no for an answer.  It's clearly not a coincidence, and it's clearly something they need to be actively trying to resolve.  End users can't fix this, nor should they be expected to.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

If you think that you can think about a thing, inextricably attached to something else, without thinking of the thing it is attached to, then you have a legal mind.

        ~ Thomas Reed Powell

 


Jackie
 

The other thing I might suggest is to ensure all sound enhancements
are turned off, which tends not to be the case w/Realtek.

That Dell would hang up on someone is just inexcusable. Believe me,
I've taken much abuse from folks over the years & never once hung up.
& I doubt she was even remotely actin like that.

On 11/30/20, Brian Vogel <britechguy@gmail.com> wrote:
On Mon, Nov 30, 2020 at 11:59 AM, Melissa Jean wrote:


dell hung up on me twice.
-
That's something I would report, too, unless you were behaving in an
outrageously abusive way toward the support tech, which I highly doubt you
were.

This is clearly something that Dell needs to be in the center of resolving,
and they need to pick up the ball.

After having read Mr. Wong's saga elsewhere before this topic started,
coupled with what's been shared here, I would be raising holy hell with Dell
about this and not taking no for an answer. It's clearly not a coincidence,
and it's clearly something they need to be actively trying to resolve. End
users can't fix this, nor should they be expected to.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042

*If you think that you can think about a thing, inextricably attached to
something else, without thinking of the thing it is attached to, then you
have a legal mind.*

~ Thomas Reed Powell





--
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& check out my sites at www.brightstarsweb.com & www.mysitesbeenhacked.com


 
Edited

Well a solution for me is to never buy a dell.

Its been known there are a lot of audio driver issues with dell units for us blind persons.

There is another reason now not to even buy dell because its just bad news for us.

As for getting it fixed.

If dell wanna fix their stuff and you need to send the laptop in, maybe they can fix it.

Maybe its an update.

 

Its obvious that they are aware of it though.


 

I just tried to do this using microsoft disability on be my eyes. She
could not locate any drivers other than real tech on my computer and
they will not install drivers not rec by manufacturer. She went to the
dell site and there was an Oct 27 update for real tech. So I installed
those... I hope that it does it but I have no confidence with real
tech to be honest.

I have more school work to do so I guess will update later.
On 11/30/20, luke scholey via groups.io
<l.scholey=lukescholey.co.uk@groups.io> wrote:
Hi all

Just to add to this:

There seems to be an issue with some (but not all) new Dell laptops that use
a version of the Realtech audio driver and NVDA.

As stated below, there’s a memory leak with the Windows Audio Device Graph
Isolation (audiodg.exe) service. When using NVDA, especially for long
periods of time, this service eats all available ram and then starts
gobbling up virtual memory as well until the device blue screens. This is
limited to when NVDA speaks, my testing has revealed that if you leave NVDA
silent for a while, the memory slowly comes back down again. This leak also
doesn’t happen when other audio is playing so it seems to be a problem with
the way NVDA uses this service. But if you’re using one of these effected
laptops in a 9 til 5 job, over a few hours, the machine would become slower
and slower.

A temporary fix for this is to find the audio driver in use in the device
manager from hardware and sound, navigate to the sounds video and game
controllers category and update the audio driver. Instead of searching for
updates on the internet automatically, choose the manual option and select
the button that will allow the user to choose a driver from a compatible
list of drivers in the same category. Usually there will only be two drivers
in this list, the current Realtech driver and the default Windows 10 driver
which is called HD Audio from Microsoft. Click this driver to update and the
audio on the machine will stop. Restart the laptop to begin using the new
updated driver. Using this HD Audio driver, the issue is no longer present.

I’m not saying NVDA is at fault here because I don’t know enough about this
yet. It could be that the driver is the culprit, and NVDA is doing things
correctly but the driver is not handling NVDA very well.

So far I’ve tested this on Dell Inspiron laptops from the 570 range and
above, from Windows 10 1809 and above and NVDA 2019.1 and above.

Hope this helps.

Luke


From: William Wong
Sent: 30 November 2020 11:19
To: nvda@groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Ram problem and nvda

H







 

On Mon, Nov 30, 2020 at 04:41 PM, Melissa Jean wrote:
I hope that it does it but I have no confidence with realtech to be honest.
-
The issue is not with Realtek audio drivers in general, or this problem would be hugely widespread across computer makes and models.  They are a very big company in audio for computers.

The problem is with the Realtek driver being issued by Dell, which I'll bet my bottom dollar that they have customized, as this is not at all uncommon practice.  That's why the first place that's generally recommended to search for drivers is the downloads and drivers support page for your exact make and model of computer.  In the vast majority of cases, that will be the best fit.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

If you think that you can think about a thing, inextricably attached to something else, without thinking of the thing it is attached to, then you have a legal mind.

        ~ Thomas Reed Powell

 


 

Viewing the issues online again, it looks like del just doesn't really care or at least care to respond to put it mildly.

A load of people have had issues with dell and their drivers.

What is worse, realtech just don't have updated drivers over the 2.82 2017 drivers so bar getting them from microsoft well who knows.

There was an unofficial driver from alanfox2000 where he just pulled driect from realtech but realtech didn't like him transfering the site directly probably because there were hacked ftp accounts involved.

Pal1000 has made a driver but its a mashed together load of scripts and other hacked rubbish.

I mean if you want to try the universal hacked driver and that solves your issue fine.

free-codecs.com has the last realtech official driver ever released earlier this year but while I have it on a few systems it has a lot of major bugs the biggest is that if you have a problem with the your speakers and unplug them,and plug in something else, then plug the speakers back they will not work unless you reboot with your device unplugged and hope sound comes back.

Or reinstall the driver.

There is also the last windows 1909 driver from windowsupdate itself which may have enough for you.

Finally there are these

https://github.com/kevinshroff/KSMRD-Modded-Realtek-Audio-Drivers

and

https://github.com/distantorigin/XPS-Enhancements

Aparently most of this stuff and all the issues have to do with waves max.

Why dell does not care to fix their stuff is beyond me but its certainly working.

I have had friends with units having other issues and there was the exploding batteries thing a while back.

Its obvious how dell stuff is designed and how it runs itself.

Its a good antiselling point.

There is no way in heck I will ever buy one ever!



On 1/12/2020 4:15 am, luke scholey via groups.io wrote:
Hi Melissa

I know how annoying this can be. See my message below for instructions on how to sort it.

Let me know if you need anymore detailed steps.

All the best
Luke



On 30 Nov 2020, at 12:17, luke scholey via groups.io <l.scholey@...> wrote:



Hi all

 

Just to add to this:

 

There seems to be an issue with some (but not all) new Dell laptops that use a version of the Realtech audio driver and NVDA.

 

As stated below, there’s a memory leak with the Windows Audio Device Graph Isolation (audiodg.exe) service. When using NVDA, especially for long periods of time, this service eats all available ram and then starts gobbling up virtual memory as well until the device blue screens. This is limited to when NVDA speaks, my testing has revealed that if you leave NVDA silent for a while, the memory slowly comes back down again. This leak also doesn’t happen when other audio is playing so it seems to be a problem with the way NVDA uses this service. But if you’re using one of these effected laptops in a 9 til 5  job, over a few hours, the machine would become slower and slower.

 

A temporary fix for this is to find the audio driver in use in the device manager from hardware and sound, navigate to the sounds video and game controllers category and update the audio driver. Instead of searching for updates on the internet automatically, choose the manual option and select the button that will allow the user to choose a driver from a compatible list of drivers in the same category. Usually there will only be two drivers in this list, the current Realtech driver and the default Windows 10 driver which is called HD Audio from Microsoft. Click this driver to update and the audio on the machine will stop. Restart the laptop to begin using the new updated driver. Using this HD Audio driver, the issue is no longer present.

 

I’m not saying NVDA is at fault here because I don’t know enough about this yet. It could be that the driver is the culprit, and NVDA is doing things correctly but the driver is not handling NVDA very well.

 

So far I’ve tested this on Dell Inspiron laptops from the 570 range and above, from Windows 10 1809 and above and NVDA 2019.1 and above.

 

Hope this helps.

 

Luke

 

 

From: William Wong
Sent: 30 November 2020 11:19
To: nvda@groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Ram problem and nvda

 

H

 


Arlene
 

That was what I was told by another blind person on another blind tec list. He said not to buy a dell because of that audio problem we’d have.  I asked on that list before I got this Acer laptop.  The person told me it slows down NVDA. There you all have it! 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Shaun Everiss
Sent: November 30, 2020 1:37 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Ram problem and nvda

 

Well a solution for me is to never buy a dell.

Its been known there are a lot of audio driver issues with dell units for us blind persons.

There is another reason now not to even buy dell because its just bad news for us.

 

 

On 1/12/2020 4:15 am, luke scholey via groups.io wrote:

Hi Melissa

 

I know how annoying this can be. See my message below for instructions on how to sort it.

 

Let me know if you need anymore detailed steps.

 

All the best

Luke

 

 



On 30 Nov 2020, at 12:17, luke scholey via groups.io <l.scholey@...> wrote:



Hi all

 

Just to add to this:

 

There seems to be an issue with some (but not all) new Dell laptops that use a version of the Realtech audio driver and NVDA.

 

As stated below, there’s a memory leak with the Windows Audio Device Graph Isolation (audiodg.exe) service. When using NVDA, especially for long periods of time, this service eats all available ram and then starts gobbling up virtual memory as well until the device blue screens. This is limited to when NVDA speaks, my testing has revealed that if you leave NVDA silent for a while, the memory slowly comes back down again. This leak also doesn’t happen when other audio is playing so it seems to be a problem with the way NVDA uses this service. But if you’re using one of these effected laptops in a 9 til 5  job, over a few hours, the machine would become slower and slower.

 

A temporary fix for this is to find the audio driver in use in the device manager from hardware and sound, navigate to the sounds video and game controllers category and update the audio driver. Instead of searching for updates on the internet automatically, choose the manual option and select the button that will allow the user to choose a driver from a compatible list of drivers in the same category. Usually there will only be two drivers in this list, the current Realtech driver and the default Windows 10 driver which is called HD Audio from Microsoft. Click this driver to update and the audio on the machine will stop. Restart the laptop to begin using the new updated driver. Using this HD Audio driver, the issue is no longer present.

 

I’m not saying NVDA is at fault here because I don’t know enough about this yet. It could be that the driver is the culprit, and NVDA is doing things correctly but the driver is not handling NVDA very well.

 

So far I’ve tested this on Dell Inspiron laptops from the 570 range and above, from Windows 10 1809 and above and NVDA 2019.1 and above.

 

Hope this helps.

 

Luke

 

 

From: William Wong
Sent: 30 November 2020 11:19
To: nvda@groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Ram problem and nvda

 

H

 

 


Arlene
 

Brian, almost all computers use Realtech.  The sale’s person said he didn’t know why but almost all computers use it. He himself is not confident with it.  He was fully sighted.  Even my last windows 7 computer used realtech.  Not sure if the old xp box did. It probably did.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Brian Vogel
Sent: November 30, 2020 1:45 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] RAM Problem with Dell computers that have Realtek HD Audio Driver, and NVDA or JAWS

 

On Mon, Nov 30, 2020 at 04:41 PM, Melissa Jean wrote:

I hope that it does it but I have no confidence with realtech to be honest.

-
The issue is not with Realtek audio drivers in general, or this problem would be hugely widespread across computer makes and models.  They are a very big company in audio for computers.

The problem is with the Realtek driver being issued by Dell, which I'll bet my bottom dollar that they have customized, as this is not at all uncommon practice.  That's why the first place that's generally recommended to search for drivers is the downloads and drivers support page for your exact make and model of computer.  In the vast majority of cases, that will be the best fit.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

If you think that you can think about a thing, inextricably attached to something else, without thinking of the thing it is attached to, then you have a legal mind.

        ~ Thomas Reed Powell

 

 


 

Hello All,

           At this point I believe it's abundantly clear that there are issues with the audio drivers issued by Dell, and that as of this point in time, they have not issued any fix.

           If this were to change, and someone has a link to a Dell supplied, official driver then please send a message containing same and I will approve it after checking.  For the moment, though, this topic is on moderated status, which essentially means locked unless I were to receive something related to an official fix from Dell or something supplied directly by Microsoft or Realtek that would resolve the issue if installed.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

If you think that you can think about a thing, inextricably attached to something else, without thinking of the thing it is attached to, then you have a legal mind.

        ~ Thomas Reed Powell

 


Gene
 

What happens if you unload NVDA then load it again. Until you solve the proboem, see if doing this off and on works around the problem.

Gene

-----Original Message-----
From: Melissa Jean
Sent: Monday, November 30, 2020 3:41 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] RAM Problem with Dell computers that have Realtek HD Audio Driver, and NVDA or JAWS

I just tried to do this using microsoft disability on be my eyes. She
could not locate any drivers other than real tech on my computer and
they will not install drivers not rec by manufacturer. She went to the
dell site and there was an Oct 27 update for real tech. So I installed
those... I hope that it does it but I have no confidence with real
tech to be honest.

I have more school work to do so I guess will update later.


William
 

Hi,

In following Luke's suggestion of changing the driver, my ram issue seemed solved, so I immediately write an official email to the responsible Dell support to request them fixing the driver issue.

I hope he really pass this to the respective party.