Running Commands with Admin Privilege


Martin McCormick
 

I really hate to hitup the list for this because I should know it
after 2 years of windows10 but I am still a bit baffled.

This is a case of not getting predictible results rather
than a case of not getting it to work at all but I read an
article on line about 8 ways to run commands as admin and it may
be a bit out of date or something because the description of what
one should read and what I actually find don't quite match.

I have tried, for example, pressing the Windows key then the
lower-case c or sometimes co and the search box fills out to
"command prompt". Rather than hitting Enter, I type
Control+Shift+Enter which is supposed to start as administrator.
I do get the warning posed as a question as to whether I want
this program to make changes to my computer. I type Alt-Y and
instead of getting the command prompt, I get another search box
with the c or co letters I already typed. I can add a few more
and the box fills out as before to command prompt. Were I to hit
Control+Shift+Enter, I'll get another warning and question and
yet another search box. I have also got a window open now with
my previous attempt still there.

Sometimes, as I am clearing the mess away, one of the
windows will have a command prompt that is admin, all right and I
can use it but this really isn't right.

The article also described using the context menu which
is usually the NumPad Multiply key and one of the choices there
is supposed to be "run as administrator."

I remember one time actually seeing this screen and it
worked but it seems like you have to hold your mouth just right
and think saintly thoughts because the other times, one sees
stuff from the control panel and so help me, I haven't figured
out what events decide whether one gets the beautiful lady or the
hungry lion.

Fortunately, in this case, one choice lets you run a
command as administrator should you be lucky enough to get it and
the other choice which is always much more likely is you get the
control panel choices, none of which are what one wanted so
nothing happens.

I realize that a context menu is going to be different
depending on what environment one is in when selecting the
context menue but the article kind of lead me to think that you
just opened the search box and then opened the context menu and
obviously, there is something I did or didn't do because it's
usually the wrong context menu.

I've also seen an admin version of the command prompt
that looks normal when I am in my home directory but when I cd to
c:\windows 32 or other system directories, I see Administrator
printed and I can run admin commands, for better or worse.

So, what could I be doing that introduces this
unpredictability in to what should do the same thing every time?

I also do have a copy of the Talking Book Windows 10, the
Missing Manual and what I am describing is probably in there
somewhere.

Thanks for any good explanation or recommendation on a good
resource.

Martin


 

Hi,
Can you tell us the publication date of this specific article? We (and
especially, I) need this info because Windows 10 keeps changing, and what
may have worked a year ago won't work quite the same. Also, the fastest way
to open Command Prompt or PowerShell in admin mode is pressing Windows+X
followed by A, then saying Yes to UAC prompt
Cheers,
Joseph

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Martin
McCormick
Sent: Monday, May 24, 2021 8:21 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Running Commands with Admin Privilege

I really hate to hitup the list for this because I should know it after 2
years of windows10 but I am still a bit baffled.

This is a case of not getting predictible results rather than a case
of not getting it to work at all but I read an article on line about 8 ways
to run commands as admin and it may be a bit out of date or something
because the description of what one should read and what I actually find
don't quite match.

I have tried, for example, pressing the Windows key then the
lower-case c or sometimes co and the search box fills out to "command
prompt". Rather than hitting Enter, I type
Control+Shift+Enter which is supposed to start as administrator.
I do get the warning posed as a question as to whether I want this program
to make changes to my computer. I type Alt-Y and instead of getting the
command prompt, I get another search box with the c or co letters I already
typed. I can add a few more and the box fills out as before to command
prompt. Were I to hit
Control+Shift+Enter, I'll get another warning and question and
yet another search box. I have also got a window open now with my previous
attempt still there.

Sometimes, as I am clearing the mess away, one of the windows will
have a command prompt that is admin, all right and I can use it but this
really isn't right.

The article also described using the context menu which is usually
the NumPad Multiply key and one of the choices there is supposed to be "run
as administrator."

I remember one time actually seeing this screen and it worked but it
seems like you have to hold your mouth just right and think saintly thoughts
because the other times, one sees stuff from the control panel and so help
me, I haven't figured out what events decide whether one gets the beautiful
lady or the hungry lion.

Fortunately, in this case, one choice lets you run a command as
administrator should you be lucky enough to get it and the other choice
which is always much more likely is you get the control panel choices, none
of which are what one wanted so nothing happens.

I realize that a context menu is going to be different depending on
what environment one is in when selecting the context menue but the article
kind of lead me to think that you just opened the search box and then opened
the context menu and obviously, there is something I did or didn't do
because it's usually the wrong context menu.

I've also seen an admin version of the command prompt that looks
normal when I am in my home directory but when I cd to c:\windows 32 or
other system directories, I see Administrator printed and I can run admin
commands, for better or worse.

So, what could I be doing that introduces this unpredictability in
to what should do the same thing every time?

I also do have a copy of the Talking Book Windows 10, the Missing
Manual and what I am describing is probably in there somewhere.

Thanks for any good explanation or recommendation on a good resource.

Martin


 

And to add what Joseph has said, once you find your "preferred road to Rome" then stick with it.

Microsoft has always had the annoying, or blessed, depending on your perspective, habit of giving you way multiple ways to achieve precisely the same ends.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H1, Build 19043  

I do not understand why some seek to separate a person from their actions.  The self is composed of an individual’s thoughts, actions, and expression, which are contained in and actuated by the body.  What you do and say is the clearest indicator of who you are.

      ~ Brian Vogel

 


Jackie
 

Martin, I find a *very* reliable, as in thus far foolproof, way to get
to command prompt is by bringing up the run dialog (windows key + r)
then typing cmd & pressing ctrl+shift+enter. This eliminates Kertonna
unpredictabilities, or whatever MS calls its alleged assistant NOW.

On 5/24/21, Brian Vogel <britechguy@gmail.com> wrote:
And to add what Joseph has said, once you find your "preferred road to Rome"
then stick with it.

Microsoft has always had the annoying, or blessed, depending on your
perspective, habit of giving you way multiple ways to achieve precisely the
same ends.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H1, Build 19043

I do not understand why some seek to separate a person from their actions.
The self is composed of an individual’s thoughts, actions, and expression,
which are contained in and actuated by the body.  What you do and say is the
clearest indicator of who you are.

~ Brian Vogel





--
Subscribe to a WordPress for Newbies Mailing List by sending a message to:
wp4newbs-request@freelists.org with 'subscribe' in the Subject field OR by
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& check out my sites at www.brightstarsweb.com & www.mysitesbeenhacked.com


Gene
 

Before you use the right click command, are you routing the mouse?  If you don’t, who knows what you are clicking on.  Also, you very likely don’t have to use the simulated mouse.  Try shift f10. 
 
Gene
 

Sent: Monday, May 24, 2021 10:20 PM
Subject: [nvda] Running Commands with Admin Privilege
 
I really hate to hitup the list for this because I should know it
after 2 years of windows10 but I am still a bit baffled.

This is a case of not getting predictible results rather
than a case of not getting it to work at all but I read an
article on line about 8 ways to run commands as admin and it may
be a bit out of date or something because the description of what
one should read and what I actually find don't quite match.

I have tried, for example, pressing the Windows key then the
lower-case c or sometimes co and the search box fills out to
"command prompt".  Rather than hitting Enter, I type
Control+Shift+Enter which is supposed to start as administrator.
I do get the warning posed as a question as to whether I want
this program to make changes to my computer.  I type Alt-Y and
instead of getting the command prompt, I get another search box
with the c or co letters I already typed.  I can add a few more
and the box fills out as before to command prompt.  Were I to hit
Control+Shift+Enter, I'll get another warning and question and
yet another search box.  I have also got a window open now with
my previous attempt still there.

Sometimes, as I am clearing the mess away, one of the
windows will have a command prompt that is admin, all right and I
can use it but this really isn't right.

The article also described using the context menu which
is usually the NumPad Multiply key and one of the choices there
is supposed to be "run as administrator."

I remember one time actually seeing this screen and it
worked but it seems like you have to hold your mouth just right
and think saintly thoughts because the other times, one sees
stuff from the control panel and so help me, I haven't figured
out what events decide whether one gets the beautiful lady or the
hungry lion.

Fortunately, in this case, one choice lets you run a
command as administrator should you be lucky enough to get it and
the other choice which is always much more likely is you get the
control panel choices, none of which are what one wanted so
nothing happens.

I realize that a context menu is going to be different
depending on what environment one is in when selecting the
context menue but the article kind of lead me to think that you
just opened the search box and then opened the context menu and
obviously, there is something I did or didn't do because it's
usually the wrong context menu.

I've also seen an admin version of the command prompt
that looks normal when I am in my home directory but when I cd to
c:\windows 32 or other system directories, I see Administrator
printed and I can run admin commands, for better or worse.

So, what could I be doing that introduces this
unpredictability in to what should do the same thing every time?

I also do have a copy of the Talking Book Windows 10, the
Missing Manual and what I am describing is probably in there
somewhere.

Thanks for any good explanation or recommendation on a good
resource.

Martin





Martin McCormick
 

First, my deepest thanks to each one of you who replied to my
question which, as I said before, I should know the answer to by
now.
"Joseph Lee" <joseph.lee22590@gmail.com> writes:
Can you tell us the publication date of this specific article? We (and
especially, I) need this info because Windows 10 keeps changing, and what
may have worked a year ago won't work quite the same.
It says that this article was

Last Updated on February 21, 2021 by admin 23 Comments

Even better, here's the url.

https://www.intowindows.com/command-prompt-as-administrator-in-windows-10/

>Also, the fastest way
to open Command Prompt or PowerShell in admin mode is pressing Windows+X,
followed by A, then saying Yes to UAC prompt
We are on to something but I am not sure what just yet.

I wonder if I am not starting out in the wrong place for
some reason.

When I wake the computer from sleep and enter the
login password, if I press nvda+divide, I am frequently on the
desktop. If I press Windows+x, I hear "context menu" from nvda.
Pressing the comma key, yields that strum sound we all love to
hear that means that nothing good, actually, nothing at all just
happened. There is no UAC prompt. Pressing the down arrow gives

Apps and FeaturesPower options, event viewer,system, device
managernetwork connections,disk management, computer management,
Windows power shell, Windows power shell (admin), task manager,
settings, File Explorer, search, run, shutdown or sign out,
and desktop

If one presses the Up arrow just after Windows+x, desktop
is the first thing above Apps and Features. I think they call
this a carousel. I really don't like those because a complex one
can trick one in to going through parts of it more than once,
thinking one is doing something new, sort of the 2021 version of
the little moron jokes that were going around in the late1950's.
Hint. On both sides of a piece of paper, one writes,

"How do you keep a little moron busy? See other side."

When I was six or seven years old, I thought it was
funny. It's still funny unless you are the one sucked in to the
modern version of it.

Anyway, Power Shell (Admin) probably makes you do the UAC
drill, but pressing the Comma just after Windows-x did nothing.

Somewhere, there is a personalize in the control panel
that lets one replace the admin power shell with the Command
Prompt.

I have discovered that Command prompt is good for many
things but Power shell is good for others. From my unix
upbringing, the command prompt as root does it all, the good, bad
and the ugly to borrow a movie title.

Martin


 

On Tue, May 25, 2021 at 09:54 AM, Martin McCormick wrote:
Anyway, Power Shell (Admin) probably makes you do the UAC
drill, but pressing the Comma just after Windows-x did nothing.

Somewhere, there is a personalize in the control panel
that lets one replace the admin power shell with the Command
Prompt.
1. Comma should do nothing.  It's neither a windows command nor is it a keyboard shortcut mapped to one of the options in the WinKey+X context menu.

2. The choice to set PowerShell versus Command Prompt in the WinKey+X menu is found in Settings, Personalization, Taskbar.  There is a toggle for Replace Command Prompt with Windows PowerShell in the menu when I right click the start button or press Windows Key + X.  I personally prefer Command Prompt because I have years of experience with it, so that's what I keep in my menu.

3. Every item, except File Explorer, in that is in the WinKey+X context menu has a single letter "third letter pressed after WinKey+X" associated with it.  If you've got it set for Command Prompt then C will open a non-admin instance whereas A will open an Admin instance of command prompt.  
 
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H1, Build 19043  

I do not understand why some seek to separate a person from their actions.  The self is composed of an individual’s thoughts, actions, and expression, which are contained in and actuated by the body.  What you do and say is the clearest indicator of who you are.

      ~ Brian Vogel

 


Martin McCormick
 

Thank you. I found the right setting and unchecked the box that
gives you Power Shell by default and now it's Command Prompt. The
context menu does reflect the change plus Command-prompt (Admin)does
make you run the UAC step.

This probably sounds a bit obsessive, but I called up the
Command-prompt in admin mode twice from Windows+x and I saw the
correct prompt both times.

Martin


 

Hi,
A bit about "comma": that's usually the way I write commands (others may
have different ideas).
At least I'm glad things are working out for you.
Cheers,
Joseph

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Martin
McCormick
Sent: Tuesday, May 25, 2021 10:20 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Cc: Martin McCormick <martin.m@suddenlink.net>
Subject: Re: [nvda] Running Commands with Admin Privilege

Thank you. I found the right setting and unchecked the box that gives you
Power Shell by default and now it's Command Prompt. The context menu does
reflect the change plus Command-prompt (Admin)does make you run the UAC
step.

This probably sounds a bit obsessive, but I called up the
Command-prompt in admin mode twice from Windows+x and I saw the correct
prompt both times.

Martin


JM Casey
 

Yeah...I always just do that 9although I use powershell mostly)...
Lol the assisant was always called Cortana, and can be disabled. But for some reason windows-x occasionally doesn't get you to the menu...something to do with the taskbar maybe? In any case I don't worry about it -- run works every time, so long as explorer is up and running (if it's flaked out for some reason you can always use task manager...)

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Jackie
Sent: May 25, 2021 02:23 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Running Commands with Admin Privilege

Martin, I find a *very* reliable, as in thus far foolproof, way to get to command prompt is by bringing up the run dialog (windows key + r) then typing cmd & pressing ctrl+shift+enter. This eliminates Kertonna unpredictabilities, or whatever MS calls its alleged assistant NOW.

On 5/24/21, Brian Vogel <britechguy@gmail.com> wrote:
And to add what Joseph has said, once you find your "preferred road to Rome"
then stick with it.

Microsoft has always had the annoying, or blessed, depending on your
perspective, habit of giving you way multiple ways to achieve
precisely the same ends.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H1, Build 19043

I do not understand why some seek to separate a person from their actions.
The self is composed of an individual’s thoughts, actions, and
expression, which are contained in and actuated by the body. What you
do and say is the clearest indicator of who you are.

~ Brian Vogel






--
Subscribe to a WordPress for Newbies Mailing List by sending a message to:
wp4newbs-request@freelists.org with 'subscribe' in the Subject field OR by visiting the list page at http://www.freelists.org/list/wp4newbs
& check out my sites at www.brightstarsweb.com & www.mysitesbeenhacked.com


 

On Tue, May 25, 2021 at 01:31 PM, Joseph Lee wrote:
A bit about "comma": that's usually the way I write commands (others may have different ideas).
-
As do I, and as does most documentation where a multi-key press, in order must occur, e.g., WinKey+X,A to run a command prompt (in my case) with admin privileges or NVDA+N,T,A to open the NVDA Add-Ons Manager.

I just couldn't interpret the meaning of, "I hit comma and it did nothing," in this context.  Just like the plus sign in two-keystroke at once sequences isn't interpreted literally, nor should comma ever be.  Some will write out something like NVDA+N, followed by T, followed by A, but that gets really unmanageable really fast.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H1, Build 19043  

I do not understand why some seek to separate a person from their actions.  The self is composed of an individual’s thoughts, actions, and expression, which are contained in and actuated by the body.  What you do and say is the clearest indicator of who you are.

      ~ Brian Vogel

 


Jackie
 

I tend to use a > sign in such circumstances. It was what I was taught
when doing malware fighter training.

On 5/25/21, Brian Vogel <britechguy@gmail.com> wrote:
On Tue, May 25, 2021 at 01:31 PM, Joseph Lee wrote:


A bit about "comma": that's usually the way I write commands (others may
have different ideas).
-
As do I, and as does most documentation where a multi-key press, in order
must occur, e.g., WinKey+X,A to run a command prompt (in my case) with admin
privileges or NVDA+N,T,A to open the NVDA Add-Ons Manager.

I just couldn't interpret the meaning of, "I hit comma and it did nothing,"
in this context.  Just like the plus sign in two-keystroke at once sequences
isn't interpreted literally, nor should comma ever be.  Some will write out
something like NVDA+N, followed by T, followed by A, but that gets really
unmanageable really fast.

--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H1, Build 19043

I do not understand why some seek to separate a person from their actions.
The self is composed of an individual’s thoughts, actions, and expression,
which are contained in and actuated by the body.  What you do and say is the
clearest indicator of who you are.

~ Brian Vogel





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Subscribe to a WordPress for Newbies Mailing List by sending a message to:
wp4newbs-request@freelists.org with 'subscribe' in the Subject field OR by
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On Tue, May 25, 2021 at 02:26 PM, Jackie wrote:
I tend to use a > sign in such circumstances.
-
I'd definitely get that, but I can tell you that I have not seen that notation commonly used.

I sometimes used that when trying to show a shorthand transition through various windows or dialogs, e.g., Settings > System > Power & sleep pane.  But more recently I just comma separate them.  I think I started doing that when I had to listen to, rather than just see, the > sign notation.  I want it to read as nothing more than a brief pause, and commas do that.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H1, Build 19043  

I do not understand why some seek to separate a person from their actions.  The self is composed of an individual’s thoughts, actions, and expression, which are contained in and actuated by the body.  What you do and say is the clearest indicator of who you are.

      ~ Brian Vogel

 


Jackie
 

Some habits are hard to break :).

On 5/25/21, Brian Vogel <britechguy@gmail.com> wrote:
On Tue, May 25, 2021 at 02:26 PM, Jackie wrote:


I tend to use a > sign in such circumstances.
-
I'd definitely get that, but I can tell you that I have not seen that
notation commonly used.

I sometimes used that when trying to show a shorthand transition through
various windows or dialogs, e.g., Settings > System > Power & sleep pane.
But more recently I just comma separate them.  I think I started doing that
when I had to listen to, rather than just see, the > sign notation.  I want
it to read as nothing more than a brief pause, and commas do that.

--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H1, Build 19043

I do not understand why some seek to separate a person from their actions.
The self is composed of an individual’s thoughts, actions, and expression,
which are contained in and actuated by the body.  What you do and say is the
clearest indicator of who you are.

~ Brian Vogel





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Subscribe to a WordPress for Newbies Mailing List by sending a message to:
wp4newbs-request@freelists.org with 'subscribe' in the Subject field OR by
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& check out my sites at www.brightstarsweb.com & www.mysitesbeenhacked.com


Martin McCormick
 

I was simply taking things too literally. Thanks again.


Martin

"Brian Vogel" <britechguy@gmail.com> writes:

On Tue, May 25, 2021 at 01:31 PM, Joseph Lee wrote:


A bit about "comma": that's usually the way I write commands (others may
have different ideas).
-
As do I, and as does most documentation where a multi-key press, in order
must occur, e.g., WinKey+X,A to run a command prompt (in my case) with
admin privileges or NVDA+N,T,A to open the NVDA Add-Ons Manager.

I just couldn't interpret the meaning of, "I hit comma and it did
nothing," in this context. Just like the plus sign in two-keystroke at
once sequences isn't interpreted literally, nor should comma ever be.
Some will write out something like NVDA+N, followed by T, followed by A,
but that gets really unmanageable really fast.

--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H1, Build 19043

I do not understand why some seek to separate a person from their
actions. The self is composed of an individual’s thoughts, actions,
and expression, which are contained in and actuated by the body. What
you do and say is the clearest indicator of who you are.

~ Brian Vogel