Screen Reader Compatibility with Third Party Website(s)


David Russell
 

Hello NVDA Group,

If a particular website and NVDA were compatible on a Windows Seven
computer, is it highly likely the same will be the case if used on a
Windows 10 computer with Chrome rather than FireFox as the default
browser?

Thank you for your input in advance.

--
David C. Russell


 

Simple answer:  Yes.

There will be the rare exception, but even those rare exceptions should not go from wonderfully accessible to "I can't get at anything anymore."
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

Always remember others may hate you but those who hate you don't win unless you hate them.  And then you destroy yourself.

       ~ Richard M. Nixon

 


Gene
 

I don’t see any reason why Windows version should make a difference.  Most sites work well in both Chrome and Firefox.  But if a site doesn’t, those who want the best chance of getting better or good access should have both on their machine. 
 
It doesn’t matter what the default browser is.  All that having a browser be the default means is that it opens when you do something like follow a link from an e-mail.  It doesn’t affect a browsers performance in any way aside from that. 
 
Gene
 

Sent: Thursday, May 20, 2021 11:02 AM
Subject: [nvda] Screen Reader Compatibility with Third Party Website(s)
 
Hello NVDA Group,

If a particular website and NVDA were compatible on a Windows Seven
computer, is it highly likely the same will be the case if used on a
Windows 10 computer with Chrome rather than FireFox as the default
browser?

Thank you for your input in advance.

--
David C. Russell





 

On Thu, May 20, 2021 at 12:11 PM, Gene wrote:
those who want the best chance of getting better or good access should have both on their machine. 
-
Accessibility aside, those who want an "optimal experience" (however they might define that) should have multiple browsers on their machine and know how to use them.  Even within a class of browsers that use the same common code (Chromium, in the case of Chromium, Chrome, MS-Edge, Brave, Vivaldi, and more) there can be slight differences in how well each "plays with" a given website.

Generally, having some variant of Firefox, if not Firefox itself, and at least two Chromium-based browsers (and MS-Edge comes with Win10) is a very good idea indeed.  And particularly where accessibility is concerned.  I've way more than once seen the same website work considerably more smoothly with a screen reader when one browser is being used versus another.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

Always remember others may hate you but those who hate you don't win unless you hate them.  And then you destroy yourself.

       ~ Richard M. Nixon

 


Luke Davis
 

Brian Vogel wrote:

Simple answer:  Yes.There will be the rare exception, but even those rare exceptions should not go from wonderfully accessible to "I can't get at anything
anymore."
You've clearly never tried to use iCloud.com in Chrome vurses Firefox. :)

After that experience you might be less general in that statement.

Luke


 

On Thu, May 20, 2021 at 12:41 PM, Luke Davis wrote:
You've clearly never tried to use iCloud.com in Chrome vurses Firefox. :)
-
I've never tried to use iCloud, period.  I assiduously avoid Apple to the maximum extent possible.

Still wouldn't change my generalization one bit.  This is what I'd call, "The exception that proves the rule."  There are always outliers on the great bell curve that do just that.  This falls into the category of very rare indeed.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

Always remember others may hate you but those who hate you don't win unless you hate them.  And then you destroy yourself.

       ~ Richard M. Nixon

 


Sarah k Alawami
 

Agreed, all I can say is, yuck!

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Luke Davis
Sent: Thursday, May 20, 2021 9:41 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Screen Reader Compatibility with Third Party Website(s)

Brian Vogel wrote:

Simple answer: Yes.There will be the rare exception, but even those
rare exceptions should not go from wonderfully accessible to "I can't get at anything anymore."
You've clearly never tried to use iCloud.com in Chrome vurses Firefox. :)

After that experience you might be less general in that statement.

Luke


Arlene
 

Can I cloud be used with windows? I use gmail. Just curious.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Luke Davis
Sent: May 20, 2021 9:41 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Screen Reader Compatibility with Third Party Website(s)

 

Brian Vogel wrote:

 

> Simple answer:  Yes.There will be the rare exception, but even those rare exceptions should not go from wonderfully accessible to "I can't get at anything

> anymore."

 

You've clearly never tried to use iCloud.com in Chrome vurses Firefox. :)

 

After that experience you might be less general in that statement.

 

Luke

 

 

 

 

 


 

Virtually any I software you can name that's not iOS has a Windows port.

But I'm not clear how iCloud would come in to the picture relative to Gmail.  I may be remembering wrong, since I don't use Apple, but I thought iCloud was Apple's equivalent of OneDrive, Google Drive, DropBox, etc.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

Always remember others may hate you but those who hate you don't win unless you hate them.  And then you destroy yourself.

       ~ Richard M. Nixon

 


Arlene
 

Yes, I cloud is apple mail. I have an I phone. It was given to me as a gift. I don’t have my gmail on it. I know it can be done that’s why I asked if I cloud can be used in a windows email client. 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Brian Vogel
Sent: May 20, 2021 4:02 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Screen Reader Compatibility with Third Party Website(s)

 

Virtually any I software you can name that's not iOS has a Windows port.

But I'm not clear how iCloud would come in to the picture relative to Gmail.  I may be remembering wrong, since I don't use Apple, but I thought iCloud was Apple's equivalent of OneDrive, Google Drive, DropBox, etc.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

Always remember others may hate you but those who hate you don't win unless you hate them.  And then you destroy yourself.

       ~ Richard M. Nixon

 

 


 

Arlene,

Presuming iCloud has standard IMAP access protocol, it can be used in an email client under any operating system, including Android and Linux, in addition to Windows.  You just have to add the account to your email client.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

Always remember others may hate you but those who hate you don't win unless you hate them.  And then you destroy yourself.

       ~ Richard M. Nixon

 


Arlene
 

H, okay. I’m okay with gmail. I was just curious.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Brian Vogel
Sent: May 20, 2021 4:34 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Screen Reader Compatibility with Third Party Website(s)

 

Arlene,

Presuming iCloud has standard IMAP access protocol, it can be used in an email client under any operating system, including Android and Linux, in addition to Windows.  You just have to add the account to your email client.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

Always remember others may hate you but those who hate you don't win unless you hate them.  And then you destroy yourself.

       ~ Richard M. Nixon

 

 


Luke Davis
 

Arlene wrote:

Can I cloud be used with windows? I use gmail. Just curious.
Absolutely. I'm not sure how "I use gmail" relates to the question, but you can download and install iCloud for Windows. It will not interfere with Gmail.
In fact, it doesn't really include anything related to the mail component except maybe contacts.

Then you can use iCloud Drive (cloud file storage synched with your iDevices), and various other iCloud features through a more or less accessible interface.
I use that to move files to and from my iPhone all the time.
I only use the iCloud Drive feature, so can only speak directly to that.

Works fine with NVDA.

You can use iCloud mail via IMAP as Brian pointed out. I used to have my @me.com address accessed from Linux that way, but haven't done it in a while.

no different than using a Gmail account in the iOS mail app.
Luke


Hope Williamson
 

I use Chrome, Firefox, and Brave, which is Chromium. I figure one of them will work.

    I used to run Waterfox, but current is unstable and classic is outdated.

On 5/20/2021 9:11 AM, Gene wrote:
I don’t see any reason why Windows version should make a difference.  Most sites work well in both Chrome and Firefox.  But if a site doesn’t, those who want the best chance of getting better or good access should have both on their machine. 
 
It doesn’t matter what the default browser is.  All that having a browser be the default means is that it opens when you do something like follow a link from an e-mail.  It doesn’t affect a browsers performance in any way aside from that. 
 
Gene
 
Sent: Thursday, May 20, 2021 11:02 AM
Subject: [nvda] Screen Reader Compatibility with Third Party Website(s)
 
Hello NVDA Group,

If a particular website and NVDA were compatible on a Windows Seven
computer, is it highly likely the same will be the case if used on a
Windows 10 computer with Chrome rather than FireFox as the default
browser?

Thank you for your input in advance.

--
David C. Russell





David Russell
 

Hello NVDA Group,

First, thanks for your responses to my query.
Second, I downloaded NVDA (current version) and the third party
website was able to be utilized as before.
I suppose there are several of us who prefer using one browser, and or
one screen reader, that works well when necessary most or all the
time.

If MS Edge and other MS products receive less than stellar reviews by
tech or anti-virus sites, is not one putting their device at risk by
relying on only adequate computer ware?

NVDA went up significantly in my likeability as a result of this
experience between it, Narrator and the third party website.
I don't want nor need a bunch of extra 'stuff' on my computer..
Thanks again!

--
David C. Russell, Author


 

David,

           I don't know of a single person who doesn't have a preferred screen reader and a preferred browser, and who uses each of these things, separately and together, almost all the time.

           At the same time, I don't know of a single person who has not experienced either a website that doesn't "play nice" with their preffered screen reader (no matter the browser) or have an occasion where a web site just works much better under one browser or another regardless of the screen reader.  Thus, if you want to save yourself a lot of grief, you have a minimum of two screen readers and two browsers, so that on the odd occasion where one or the other is "being cranky" you can mix and match to get over the bump and to know which of the two is "the cranky party."

            In any version of Windows, you can pretty much count on whatever Microsoft ships with it being supported by any major screen reader maker for the PC platform.  Edge is just another of many Chromium-based browsers, all of which have good reputations and have proven themselves robust and as safe as can reasonably be expected.

             Your own description of what went down with regard to Narrator versus NVDA and a specific website is the textbook example of why knowledge of at least two screen readers, even if proficiency with one of those two falls into the "I can just get by for very typical stuff" level, and two browsers is necessary.  If you stick with any two of the Chromium-based browsers the things you already know from one will transfer directly over to the other.  (There are a few exceptions with regard to Edge, as Microsoft decided to keep certain terminology they've always liked, e.g., Favorites rather than the otherwise ubiquitous Bookmarks, and the commands sometimes differ a bit as a result.  But those are few compared to what is shared between any two Chromium-based browsers.)
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

Always remember others may hate you but those who hate you don't win unless you hate them.  And then you destroy yourself.

       ~ Richard M. Nixon

 


Hope Williamson
 

As an example, I currently run NVDA, JAWS, and have used narrator in crash situations. As for browsers, I have Chrome, Firefox, and Brave. Of course Edge is here, but I don't use it.

On 5/21/2021 11:51 AM, Brian Vogel wrote:
David,

           I don't know of a single person who doesn't have a preferred screen reader and a preferred browser, and who uses each of these things, separately and together, almost all the time.

           At the same time, I don't know of a single person who has not experienced either a website that doesn't "play nice" with their preffered screen reader (no matter the browser) or have an occasion where a web site just works much better under one browser or another regardless of the screen reader.  Thus, if you want to save yourself a lot of grief, you have a minimum of two screen readers and two browsers, so that on the odd occasion where one or the other is "being cranky" you can mix and match to get over the bump and to know which of the two is "the cranky party."

            In any version of Windows, you can pretty much count on whatever Microsoft ships with it being supported by any major screen reader maker for the PC platform.  Edge is just another of many Chromium-based browsers, all of which have good reputations and have proven themselves robust and as safe as can reasonably be expected.

             Your own description of what went down with regard to Narrator versus NVDA and a specific website is the textbook example of why knowledge of at least two screen readers, even if proficiency with one of those two falls into the "I can just get by for very typical stuff" level, and two browsers is necessary.  If you stick with any two of the Chromium-based browsers the things you already know from one will transfer directly over to the other.  (There are a few exceptions with regard to Edge, as Microsoft decided to keep certain terminology they've always liked, e.g., Favorites rather than the otherwise ubiquitous Bookmarks, and the commands sometimes differ a bit as a result.  But those are few compared to what is shared between any two Chromium-based browsers.)
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

Always remember others may hate you but those who hate you don't win unless you hate them.  And then you destroy yourself.

       ~ Richard M. Nixon

 


Gene
 

What less than stellar reviews?  Edge is considered by many computer observers as a better browser than Google and what I’ve read about it is persuasive. 
 
Gene

-----Original Message-----
Sent: Friday, May 21, 2021 1:38 PM
Subject: [nvda] RE Screen Reader Compatibility with Third Party Websites
 
Hello NVDA Group,

First, thanks for your responses to my query.
Second, I downloaded NVDA (current version) and the third party
website was able to be utilized as before.
I suppose there are several of us who prefer using one browser, and or
one screen reader, that works well when necessary most or all the
time.

If MS Edge and other MS products receive less than stellar reviews by
tech or anti-virus sites, is not one putting their device at risk by
relying on only adequate computer ware?

NVDA went up significantly in my likeability as a result of this
experience between it, Narrator and the third party website.
I don't want nor need a bunch of extra 'stuff' on my computer..
Thanks again!

--
David C. Russell, Author