stream pc audio with nvda remote?


mslion
 

dear all,
I am currently using nvda remote across the internet with a direct connection to a virtual machine.
I am wandering however, is it also possible either via nvda remote or other program to stream other sound of the pc?
Tnx for the tips.

With kind regards,
Mitchel Snel


Russell James
 

If both computers are running Windows you can use remote desktop to access the other computer and it supports audio tunnel through that connection

Russ


On Sun, Apr 18, 2021, 5:58 AM mslion <brailletijger@...> wrote:
dear all,
I am currently using nvda remote across the internet with a direct connection to a virtual machine.
I am wandering however, is it also possible either via nvda remote or other program to stream other sound of the pc?
Tnx for the tips.

With kind regards,
Mitchel Snel





Vinod Benjamin
 

dear all,
is remote desktop is accessible friendly while i connect with NVDA Remote?

Regards,

Vinod Benjamin

On 4/18/21, Russell James <4rjames@gmail.com> wrote:
If both computers are running Windows you can use remote desktop to access
the other computer and it supports audio tunnel through that connection

Russ

On Sun, Apr 18, 2021, 5:58 AM mslion <brailletijger@gmail.com> wrote:

dear all,
I am currently using nvda remote across the internet with a direct
connection to a virtual machine.
I am wandering however, is it also possible either via nvda remote or
other program to stream other sound of the pc?
Tnx for the tips.

With kind regards,
Mitchel Snel









Carlos Esteban Martínez Macías
 

Hi all.
NVDA Remote only send the text that NVDA speak and show in a Braille Display, and sound events of NVDA. For the sound or other applications, you can use Team Viewer, for example.
Regards.

--

Músico (pianista) y ayuda a usuarios ciegos y con discapacidad visual en el uso de lectores de pantalla y tecnología. Experto certificado en el lector de pantalla NVDA.

Musician (pianist) and help to the blind people and with visual disability in use of screen readers and technology. Certified expert in the screen reader NVDA.


Vinod Benjamin
 

dear all,

Is Team Viewer is accessible friendly. with NVDA.
and i am looking some thing like JAWS Tandam ,
also NVDA Remote is very Lite.

Regards.

Vinod Benjamin

On 4/18/21, Carlos Esteban Martínez Macías via groups.io
<cesteban.martinez=nvda.es@groups.io> wrote:
Hi all.
NVDA Remote only send the text that NVDA speak and show in a Braille
Display, and sound events of NVDA. For the sound or other applications, you
can use Team Viewer, for example.
Regards.

--

Músico (pianista) y ayuda a usuarios ciegos y con discapacidad visual en el
uso de lectores de pantalla y tecnología. Experto certificado en el lector
de pantalla NVDA.

Musician (pianist) and help to the blind people and with visual disability
in use of screen readers and technology. Certified expert in the screen
reader NVDA.






Russell James
 

Team Viewer is another alternative to provide remote access
I'm not a user but I know blind users that have said they use it...

Some businesses don't allow Team Viewer so you may need to check with the IT department...

However, if you are using Windows on both computers you can use Microsoft Remote Desktop for free.
It can be configured to share audio and devices and the clipboard between computers.
Therefore, if NVDA is running on the remote computer you can hear it on the local computer.

Russ


On Sun, Apr 18, 2021 at 1:55 PM Vinod Benjamin <vinbenji.group@...> wrote:
dear all,

Is Team Viewer is accessible friendly. with NVDA.
and i am looking some thing like JAWS Tandam ,
also NVDA Remote is very Lite.

Regards.

Vinod Benjamin

On 4/18/21, Carlos Esteban Martínez Macías via groups.io
<cesteban.martinez=nvda.es@groups.io> wrote:
> Hi all.
> NVDA Remote only send the text that NVDA speak and show in a Braille
> Display, and sound events of NVDA. For the sound or other applications, you
> can use Team Viewer, for example.
> Regards.
>
> --
>
> Músico (pianista) y ayuda a usuarios ciegos y con discapacidad visual en el
> uso de lectores de pantalla y tecnología. Experto certificado en el lector
> de pantalla NVDA.
>
> Musician (pianist) and help to the blind people and with visual disability
> in use of screen readers and technology. Certified expert in the screen
> reader NVDA.
>
>
>
>
>
>






Luke Davis
 

There used to be software called Airfoil, that sent audio from one computer to any others. However it has been discontinued.

The spiritual successor seems to be this: https://www.stardock.com/products/acousticbridge/
And before you ask: I don't know if it's accessible.

As for more DIY answers.

Doing this kind of thing was much more popular 10-15 years ago it seems.
Most of the solutions out there speak of Win 7, vista, or 98. Most software for doing it has gone away now, or can only be found in very old versions.

Pulseaudio can do this, but God bless you and help you if you decide to spend time working with Pulseaudio. Even I won't go near that one any more.

There are several possible solutions here:
https://sound.stackexchange.com/questions/22921/stream-windows-audio-over-the-network

The best one seems to be the Edcast -> Icecast answer, but even Edcast is only available in the Google Code Vault.

Another (partial) option might be this software here:
https://github.com/duncanthrax/scream

It claims to only work on the local network, but if you are clever with networking and such you might be able to convince it to work over a point to point VPN or something like that.

Were I to try this, I would probably use FFMpeg to pick up the local PCM stream, convert it to MP3 or OGG, pipe that into a local icecast server, and have your remote machine listen to that compressed stream.
Alternatively, you might be able to do something with VLC, but I'm no expert.

There are recipes out there for going from Linux to Windows via FFMPeg and FFPlay. I'm sure you could adapt those for Windows-to-Windows, using the loopback sound driver that Windows has.

Good luck.

--
Luke

"In this life there are obstacles, and forces who overcome obstacles. You can be either one or the other.
If you refuse to even try to clear an obstacle, you become the obstacle."
- Joel Shepherd


Vinod Benjamin
 

Dear Luke,

Thanks for the extensive reply, let me try.

Regards,
Vinod Benjamin

On 4/19/21, Luke Davis <luke@newanswertech.com> wrote:
There used to be software called Airfoil, that sent audio from one computer
to
any others. However it has been discontinued.

The spiritual successor seems to be this:
https://www.stardock.com/products/acousticbridge/
And before you ask: I don't know if it's accessible.

As for more DIY answers.

Doing this kind of thing was much more popular 10-15 years ago it seems.
Most of the solutions out there speak of Win 7, vista, or 98. Most software
for
doing it has gone away now, or can only be found in very old versions.

Pulseaudio can do this, but God bless you and help you if you decide to
spend
time working with Pulseaudio. Even I won't go near that one any more.

There are several possible solutions here:
https://sound.stackexchange.com/questions/22921/stream-windows-audio-over-the-network

The best one seems to be the Edcast -> Icecast answer, but even Edcast is
only
available in the Google Code Vault.

Another (partial) option might be this software here:
https://github.com/duncanthrax/scream

It claims to only work on the local network, but if you are clever with
networking and such you might be able to convince it to work over a point to

point VPN or something like that.

Were I to try this, I would probably use FFMpeg to pick up the local PCM
stream,
convert it to MP3 or OGG, pipe that into a local icecast server, and have
your
remote machine listen to that compressed stream.
Alternatively, you might be able to do something with VLC, but I'm no
expert.

There are recipes out there for going from Linux to Windows via FFMPeg and
FFPlay. I'm sure you could adapt those for Windows-to-Windows, using the
loopback sound driver that Windows has.

Good luck.

--
Luke

"In this life there are obstacles, and forces who overcome obstacles. You
can be either one or the other.
If you refuse to even try to clear an obstacle, you become the obstacle."
- Joel Shepherd






Bob Cavanaugh <cavbob1993@...>
 

Re: Edcast.
While Edcast isn't around anymore, the developers have reorganized and
come out with Alta Cast, which looks and I assume functions very
similarly to Edcast. I installed Alta Cast a few months ago hoping to
test how it streams with Zara over a test server, but haven't gotten
around to setting one up yet.

On 4/19/21, Vinod Benjamin <vinbenji.group@gmail.com> wrote:
Dear Luke,

Thanks for the extensive reply, let me try.

Regards,
Vinod Benjamin

On 4/19/21, Luke Davis <luke@newanswertech.com> wrote:
There used to be software called Airfoil, that sent audio from one
computer
to
any others. However it has been discontinued.

The spiritual successor seems to be this:
https://www.stardock.com/products/acousticbridge/
And before you ask: I don't know if it's accessible.

As for more DIY answers.

Doing this kind of thing was much more popular 10-15 years ago it seems.
Most of the solutions out there speak of Win 7, vista, or 98. Most
software
for
doing it has gone away now, or can only be found in very old versions.

Pulseaudio can do this, but God bless you and help you if you decide to
spend
time working with Pulseaudio. Even I won't go near that one any more.

There are several possible solutions here:
https://sound.stackexchange.com/questions/22921/stream-windows-audio-over-the-network

The best one seems to be the Edcast -> Icecast answer, but even Edcast is
only
available in the Google Code Vault.

Another (partial) option might be this software here:
https://github.com/duncanthrax/scream

It claims to only work on the local network, but if you are clever with
networking and such you might be able to convince it to work over a point
to

point VPN or something like that.

Were I to try this, I would probably use FFMpeg to pick up the local PCM
stream,
convert it to MP3 or OGG, pipe that into a local icecast server, and have
your
remote machine listen to that compressed stream.
Alternatively, you might be able to do something with VLC, but I'm no
expert.

There are recipes out there for going from Linux to Windows via FFMPeg
and
FFPlay. I'm sure you could adapt those for Windows-to-Windows, using the
loopback sound driver that Windows has.

Good luck.

--
Luke

"In this life there are obstacles, and forces who overcome obstacles. You
can be either one or the other.
If you refuse to even try to clear an obstacle, you become the obstacle."
- Joel Shepherd