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Tiger software suite accessibility with NVDA?


Josh Kennedy
 
Edited

hi,

Is tiger software suite the software used by the tiger braille embossers along with Microsoft word is it accessible with screen readers such as or NVDA? I am considering saving money and getting the basic configuration of the braille buddy embosser. But first I would like to know if the tiger software suite is accessible or not. I would probably just be using it with braille blaster, perky duck, and perhaps Microsoft office once I buy the home version.
Sent from my iPhone


Mobeen Iqbal
 

Hi Josh.

Yes, it's accessible. The word add-on certainly is and so is the tiger editor.

Very best wishes,

Mo.

On 25/12/2020 12:32, Josh Kennedy wrote:
hi,

Is tiger software sweet the software used by the tiger braille embossers along with Microsoft word is it accessible with screen readers such as or NVDA? I am considering saving money and getting the basic configuration of the braille buddy embosser. But first I would like to know if the tiger software suite is accessible or not. I would probably just be using it with braille blaster, perky duck, and perhaps Microsoft office once I buy the home version.
Sent from my iPhone




Scott Berry <sb356607@...>
 

Go check it out that's the only way you will laearn Josh.

On 12/25/2020 5:32 AM, Josh Kennedy wrote:
hi,

Is tiger software sweet the software used by the tiger braille embossers along with Microsoft word is it accessible with screen readers such as or NVDA? I am considering saving money and getting the basic configuration of the braille buddy embosser. But first I would like to know if the tiger software suite is accessible or not. I would probably just be using it with braille blaster, perky duck, and perhaps Microsoft office once I buy the home version.
Sent from my iPhone




Ali Savas
 

Hi,

I had to make the experience so far that the tiger software suite is
somehow usable, but I would not speak of accessible here yet. Actually
very sad, considering that the target group is actually the blind users.

Regards
Ali


 

On Sat, Dec 26, 2020 at 08:42 AM, Scott Berry wrote:
Go check it out that's the only way you will learn
-
Amen to that!  And since you can download a 30-day trial at the ViewPlus Page for Tiger Software Suite 7, you have absolutely nothing to lose.

The best way to determine if something is accessible, or at least "accessible enough for what I need it for," is to play with it yourself.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

[Regarding the Supreme Court refusing to hear the case brought by Texas to overturn the votes certified by 4 states:Pleased with the SCOTUS ruling, but also immediately slightly terrified of where this crazy train goes next.  We should know by now there’s a bottomless supply of crazy.

        ~ Brendan Buck, former adviser to Speakers of the House Paul Ryan and John Boehner 

 


Jonathan COHN
 

No, I can't see how Tiger could make the designer portion of their software accessible. it allows one to import images and then reduce their complexity so that millions of colors and pixels can be represented on a dot scale that has just a few heights. i believe the import and emboss portions of the software are usable by screen readers, but taking a multi-color representation of the internal combustion engine and rendering that or parts of that to be useable as a training tool for the blind is something that in our current technology phase requires one to have some working vision. I would love to hear ideas of how this could be done, but that would not belong on this list.


on dec 26, 2020, at 08:54, ali savas <ali-savas@gmx.de> wrote:

hi,

i had to make the experience so far that the tiger software suite is
somehow usable, but i would not speak of accessible here yet. actually
very sad, considering that the target group is actually the blind users.

regards
ali


Gene
 

That isn't necessarily true.  It depends on how much you know about using your screen-reader.  A program may not be properly accessible, but usable using things like object navigation and screen review in NVDA and the screen review methods a screen-reader other than NVDA makes available if you use a different one.  Looking through a program and trying it may tell you a good deal but it may still be useful to discuss further how to use it if you can't do what you want and your screen-reader knowledge isn't extensive about the various review methods offered.


Gene

On 12/26/2020 10:10 AM, Brian Vogel wrote:

On Sat, Dec 26, 2020 at 08:42 AM, Scott Berry wrote:
Go check it out that's the only way you will learn
-
Amen to that!  And since you can download a 30-day trial at the ViewPlus Page for Tiger Software Suite 7, you have absolutely nothing to lose.

The best way to determine if something is accessible, or at least "accessible enough for what I need it for," is to play with it yourself.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

[Regarding the Supreme Court refusing to hear the case brought by Texas to overturn the votes certified by 4 states:Pleased with the SCOTUS ruling, but also immediately slightly terrified of where this crazy train goes next.  We should know by now there’s a bottomless supply of crazy.

        ~ Brendan Buck, former adviser to Speakers of the House Paul Ryan and John Boehner 

 


 

On Sat, Dec 26, 2020 at 05:00 PM, Gene wrote:
That isn't necessarily true. 
-
Gene, yes, that is necessarily true.  I never said that people couldn't discuss what they want to discuss, but you get no better idea of how a program works with the screen reader you're using, and your current skill with same, than playing with it.

That's true of anything.  Hands on is worth a thousand times more than what anyone else tells you.  Even when you hit roadblocks, you can then clearly identify where those are to ask further questions.

Asking about the accessibility of something purely in the abstract, when you can actually try it out for yourself, is not a good use of time beyond learning if something's just not accessible at all.  And I have seen way more than my share of declarations that software is "completely inaccessible" where I know for fact it is not because I have either played with it myself with a screen reader or had a client that used it.  There's a reason I included the observation, "accessible enough for what I want it for," because while 100% accessibility is the ideal, there's lots of software that's less than perfect where it's still just fine for the things the individual intends to use it for.

The best way to make these determinations is for the end user to play, play, play with the software.  And it doesn't matter what their skill with their screen reader is, because it's their baseline skill.  Accessibility questions revolve around teaching screen reader skills just as often as teaching specific software skills.

You constantly put up road blocks for things that are not relevant.  You start, for any you, with the skill set you've got.  You don't wait for the ideal, nor do you presume lack of skill absent evidence of same.  For heaven's sake, just stop!
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

[Regarding the Supreme Court refusing to hear the case brought by Texas to overturn the votes certified by 4 states:Pleased with the SCOTUS ruling, but also immediately slightly terrified of where this crazy train goes next.  We should know by now there’s a bottomless supply of crazy.

        ~ Brendan Buck, former adviser to Speakers of the House Paul Ryan and John Boehner 

 


 

Well there are 3d printers.

Now you couldn't create the model or image to throw at it but in theory if you could get that and had the components you could make a model.

That may be accessible..

People use 3d printers to make everything, in theory you could make bits of humans like eyes for existance.

In practice, nasa has used 3d printers to build rockets and things and they work so yeah, its got potential.

For the home users you can only make plastic models but if you had the ability and the models, toner, etc then you could make a modle of an engine maybe.

On 27/12/2020 6:41 am, Jonathan COHN via groups.io wrote:
No, I can't see how Tiger could make the designer portion of their software accessible. it allows one to import images and then reduce their complexity so that millions of colors and pixels can be represented on a dot scale that has just a few heights. i believe the import and emboss portions of the software are usable by screen readers, but taking a multi-color representation of the internal combustion engine and rendering that or parts of that to be useable as a training tool for the blind is something that in our current technology phase requires one to have some working vision. I would love to hear ideas of how this could be done, but that would not belong on this list.


on dec 26, 2020, at 08:54, ali savas <ali-savas@gmx.de> wrote:

hi,

i had to make the experience so far that the tiger software suite is
somehow usable, but i would not speak of accessible here yet. actually
very sad, considering that the target group is actually the blind users.

regards
ali