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What are the accessible mathematics read and write solutions?


=?ISO-2022-JP?Q?=1B$B9b=4082=22=1B=28J?=
 

Hi,

How do you write math equations to the sighted person with nvda?
Are there accessible methods for reading and writting mathematical meterials?


Sascha Cowley
 

There is MathPlayer, which works with NVDA and Firefox to make some maths content accessible. It also supposedly works with Microsoft Word, though I have personally never managed to get this working.
With experimental UIA support enabled for Word, native equations in Word are fairly accessible, or were when I tried it some months ago. I've also had a little success using equations in Google Docs, though I had trouble inputting them. I have not worked with the Docs equation editor very much at all, though, so I may have just been missing something.
Using LaTeX, or a similar (even ad hoc) plane text notation is often successful. The advantage with LaTeX is that it produces nicely typeset output. Unfortunately, it is extremely picky, and debugging output is often not very helpful. Plus it's just a lot to learn.


Bruno Aníbal Prieto González
 

I recommend using Pandoc to convert between different formats. If you
have a file, in Word or LaTeX format, you can convert it to html and
read it with the NVDA Access8Math add-on. If you want to produce math,
you can use Markdown, and formulas are entered between $here goes the
formula$, inside those dollar signs you must enter the formula in
LaTeX format. You can convert that to PDF, Word, HTML, etc.

2021-04-06 5:03 GMT-04:00, Sascha Cowley via groups.io
<sascha.camille=yahoo.com@groups.io>:

There is MathPlayer ( https://www.dessci.com/en/products/mathplayer/ ) ,
which works with NVDA and Firefox to make some maths content accessible. It
also supposedly works with Microsoft Word, though I have personally never
managed to get this working.
With experimental UIA support enabled for Word, native equations in Word are
fairly accessible, or were when I tried it some months ago. I've also had a
little success using equations in Google Docs, though I had trouble
inputting them. I have not worked with the Docs equation editor very much at
all, though, so I may have just been missing something.
Using LaTeX, or a similar (even ad hoc) plane text notation is often
successful. The advantage with LaTeX is that it produces nicely typeset
output. Unfortunately, it is extremely picky, and debugging output is often
not very helpful. Plus it's just a lot to learn.