what next


ken lawrence
 

Hi NVDA apparently BIOS is set this way in default the HP tech support says that BIOS is outside windows and therefore screen reader won’t work.  Will narrator work this way and if not can a blind user change this setting and regain use of function keys that way?  I’ve deleted more of the HP stuff on this machine and can’tcompletely get rid of inaccessible mcafee antivirus. Boy why do blind people have to fight these battles in 2021? 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 


Jackie
 

The short answer is no. The long answer is h*** (rhymes w/tech) no. I
suggest getting extremely good sighted assistance, because you mess
w/the wrong thing in BIOS, and things can go pear-shaped very quickly.
& this is 1 reason why I tend to steer clear of HP.

The battles grind on w/no end in sight, 2021 and beyond.

On 10/20/21, ken lawrence via groups.io
<kenlawrence124=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi NVDA apparently BIOS is set this way in default the HP tech support says
that BIOS is outside windows and therefore screen reader won’t work. Will
narrator work this way and if not can a blind user change this setting and
regain use of function keys that way? I’ve deleted more of the HP stuff on
this machine and can’tcompletely get rid of inaccessible mcafee antivirus.
Boy why do blind people have to fight these battles in 2021?

Sent from Mail for Windows







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Subscribe to a WordPress for Newbies Mailing List by sending a message to:
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Gene
 

This has nothing to do with the screen-reader.  Narrator, being another screen-reader, will not work around the problem.  If someone didn’t use a screen-reader, the fn keys would function the same way.  Either your computer manufacturer provides a way to control this behavior using  commands provided not in BIOS or you will have to have someone change the BIOS setting.
 
Gene

-----Original Message-----
Sent: Wednesday, October 20, 2021 12:40 PM
Subject: [nvda] what next
 

Hi NVDA apparently BIOS is set this way in default the HP tech support says that BIOS is outside windows and therefore screen reader won’t work.  Will narrator work this way and if not can a blind user change this setting and regain use of function keys that way?  I’ve deleted more of the HP stuff on this machine and can’tcompletely get rid of inaccessible mcafee antivirus. Boy why do blind people have to fight these battles in 2021? 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 


Mohamed
 

HP actually has a BIOS configuration utility that can be used to edit BIOS settings from within Windows. https://ftp.ext.hp.com/pub/caps-softpaq/cmit/HP_BCU.html. this is a command line app that allows you to configure BIOS settings by editing a text file. You'll need to generate a text file of your current BIOS settings, and disable the setting called Action Key Mode by removing the asterisk from enabled and moving it to disable.

On 10/20/2021 1:40 PM, ken lawrence via groups.io wrote:

Hi NVDA apparently BIOS is set this way in default the HP tech support says that BIOS is outside windows and therefore screen reader won’t work.  Will narrator work this way and if not can a blind user change this setting and regain use of function keys that way?  I’ve deleted more of the HP stuff on this machine and can’tcompletely get rid of inaccessible mcafee antivirus. Boy why do blind people have to fight these battles in 2021? 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 


Chris Mullins
 

Hi Ken

You can also download a mcafee removal tool from the mcafee web site.  I do not know how accessible it is but it should get rid of the remaining components.

 

Cheers

Chris

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: Mohamed
Sent: 20 October 2021 19:45
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] what next

 

HP actually has a BIOS configuration utility that can be used to edit BIOS settings from within Windows. https://ftp.ext.hp.com/pub/caps-softpaq/cmit/HP_BCU.html. this is a command line app that allows you to configure BIOS settings by editing a text file. You'll need to generate a text file of your current BIOS settings, and disable the setting called Action Key Mode by removing the asterisk from enabled and moving it to disable.

On 10/20/2021 1:40 PM, ken lawrence via groups.io wrote:

Hi NVDA apparently BIOS is set this way in default the HP tech support says that BIOS is outside windows and therefore screen reader won’t work.  Will narrator work this way and if not can a blind user change this setting and regain use of function keys that way?  I’ve deleted more of the HP stuff on this machine and can’tcompletely get rid of inaccessible mcafee antivirus. Boy why do blind people have to fight these battles in 2021? 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

 


Chris
 

Tech support are correct, and narrator wont work within the bios/uefi

So you will need sighted help to change the setting unfortunately

 

 

 

From: ken lawrence via groups.io
Sent: 20 October 2021 18:40
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] what next

 

Hi NVDA apparently BIOS is set this way in default the HP tech support says that BIOS is outside windows and therefore screen reader won’t work.  Will narrator work this way and if not can a blind user change this setting and regain use of function keys that way?  I’ve deleted more of the HP stuff on this machine and can’tcompletely get rid of inaccessible mcafee antivirus. Boy why do blind people have to fight these battles in 2021? 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

 


dennis huckle
 

Hello all,

I can definitely confirm that to do anything in the bios you, like me will need sighted assistance.

Of course its really important that you know exactly what you want to achieve so as to assist yoin making the correct dicisions within bios.

ur sighted assistant

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Chris via groups.io
Sent: 20 October 2021 21:23
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] what next

 

Tech support are correct, and narrator wont work within the bios/uefi

So you will need sighted help to change the setting unfortunately

 

 

 

From: ken lawrence via groups.io
Sent: 20 October 2021 18:40
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] what next

 

Hi NVDA apparently BIOS is set this way in default the HP tech support says that BIOS is outside windows and therefore screen reader won’t work.  Will narrator work this way and if not can a blind user change this setting and regain use of function keys that way?  I’ve deleted more of the HP stuff on this machine and can’tcompletely get rid of inaccessible mcafee antivirus. Boy why do blind people have to fight these battles in 2021? 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

 


dennis huckle
 

Sorry folks,

Didn’t sign my name on last post.

Kind regards,

Dennis huckle.

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Chris via groups.io
Sent: 20 October 2021 21:23
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] what next

 

Tech support are correct, and narrator wont work within the bios/uefi

So you will need sighted help to change the setting unfortunately

 

 

 

From: ken lawrence via groups.io
Sent: 20 October 2021 18:40
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] what next

 

Hi NVDA apparently BIOS is set this way in default the HP tech support says that BIOS is outside windows and therefore screen reader won’t work.  Will narrator work this way and if not can a blind user change this setting and regain use of function keys that way?  I’ve deleted more of the HP stuff on this machine and can’tcompletely get rid of inaccessible mcafee antivirus. Boy why do blind people have to fight these battles in 2021? 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

 


 

On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 02:45 PM, Mohamed wrote:
HP actually has a BIOS configuration utility that can be used to edit BIOS settings from within Windows. https://ftp.ext.hp.com/pub/caps-softpaq/cmit/HP_BCU.html. this is a command line app that allows you to configure BIOS settings by editing a text file.
-
And unless you happen to know exactly what you're doing, I would never recommend that an end user go this route unless they are already intimately familiar with updating UEFI/BIOS, and very few are.

You can very easily brick a machine by very small changes in just the wrong spots in BIOS settings.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H1, Build 19043  

The ignorance of one voter in a democracy impairs the security of all.

         ~ John F. Kennedy

 


 

Also, anyone considering the HP BIOS Configuration Utility should take a look at its User Guide to determine if they even want to "go there."
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H1, Build 19043  

The ignorance of one voter in a democracy impairs the security of all.

         ~ John F. Kennedy

 


Arlene
 

I agree with Jackie. I’d stay clear of the BIOS I’ll get sighted assistance.  I hope in the future blind users can go in there with Nairator. You pretty much would have to know what’s in there.  You’d have to know what to fix and what not to fix. I’d stay clear of it. 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: ken lawrence via groups.io
Sent: October 20, 2021 10:40 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] what next

 

Hi NVDA apparently BIOS is set this way in default the HP tech support says that BIOS is outside windows and therefore screen reader won’t work.  Will narrator work this way and if not can a blind user change this setting and regain use of function keys that way?  I’ve deleted more of the HP stuff on this machine and can’tcompletely get rid of inaccessible mcafee antivirus. Boy why do blind people have to fight these battles in 2021? 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

 


 

On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 07:32 PM, Arlene wrote:
I hope in the future blind users can go in there with Nairator.
-
Not likely.

What folks who use screen readers, as they currently exist, need to understand is that they are application software.  Mind you, a very specialized application, but still an application.  The operating system (whether Windows or any other one) must be up and running at least to a certain point before any screen reader can come online.

UEFI/BIOS occur in the boot sequence well prior to Windows (or other OSes such as Linux) ever being kicked off for loading.  While it would be conceivably possible to have a dedicated screen reader for that environment, and if memory serves a prototype was once made, long ago, it certainly would not be Narrator, NVDA, JAWS or any other screen reader as end users know them.  And it would also very likely have commands strictly limited to the environment at hand, which means it would be very different in that way, too.

And, as you mention, even if you were to have a screen reader of some sort available to navigate UEFI/BIOS, you still have to be very, very certain that what you're doing is precisely what you intend to do and that what you intend is actually what needs to be done to achieve the result hoped for.   If you can have this certainty, then go for it, otherwise, get assistance.  And this is completely separate from your visual status.  Most of my sighted clients have no idea that UEFI/BIOS even exists nor how to interact with it.  It's just not something most end users ever need to touch.

As far as turning off "media keys" or whatever a maker might call the actions associated with the function keys, lobbying them to create utilities such as the one Lenovo already has that allow these to be turned on or off from within Windows, or asking for some keyboard shortcut, likely a 4-key press to avoid accidents, to do this are both better ideas than a screen reader for UEFI/BIOS likely would be.  They're safer, too.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H1, Build 19043  

The ignorance of one voter in a democracy impairs the security of all.

         ~ John F. Kennedy

 


David Goldfield
 

If memory serves the American Printing House for the Blind once produced a device which allowed users to access BIOS settings during the boot sequence. I believe it was a hardware device and it was made for DOS-based PCs. It was pronounced Speakualizer although I don’t know the spelling. Needless to say the device is no longer available and it wouldn’t work even if you could find one on Ebay. Still it would be very nifty if we could have something like it for today’s computers assuming the technology on today’s machines would even allow for interfacing with such a device.

 

David Goldfield,

Blindness Assistive Technology Specialist

JAWS Certified, 2019

Subscribe to the Tech-VI announcement list to receive emails regarding news and events in the blindness assistive technology field.

Email: tech-vi+subscribe@groups.io

 

www.DavidGoldfield.org

 

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Wednesday, October 20, 2021 7:47 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] what next

 

On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 07:32 PM, Arlene wrote:

I hope in the future blind users can go in there with Nairator.

-
Not likely.

What folks who use screen readers, as they currently exist, need to understand is that they are application software.  Mind you, a very specialized application, but still an application.  The operating system (whether Windows or any other one) must be up and running at least to a certain point before any screen reader can come online.

UEFI/BIOS occur in the boot sequence well prior to Windows (or other OSes such as Linux) ever being kicked off for loading.  While it would be conceivably possible to have a dedicated screen reader for that environment, and if memory serves a prototype was once made, long ago, it certainly would not be Narrator, NVDA, JAWS or any other screen reader as end users know them.  And it would also very likely have commands strictly limited to the environment at hand, which means it would be very different in that way, too.

And, as you mention, even if you were to have a screen reader of some sort available to navigate UEFI/BIOS, you still have to be very, very certain that what you're doing is precisely what you intend to do and that what you intend is actually what needs to be done to achieve the result hoped for.   If you can have this certainty, then go for it, otherwise, get assistance.  And this is completely separate from your visual status.  Most of my sighted clients have no idea that UEFI/BIOS even exists nor how to interact with it.  It's just not something most end users ever need to touch.

As far as turning off "media keys" or whatever a maker might call the actions associated with the function keys, lobbying them to create utilities such as the one Lenovo already has that allow these to be turned on or off from within Windows, or asking for some keyboard shortcut, likely a 4-key press to avoid accidents, to do this are both better ideas than a screen reader for UEFI/BIOS likely would be.  They're safer, too.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H1, Build 19043  

The ignorance of one voter in a democracy impairs the security of all.

         ~ John F. Kennedy

 


Jackie
 

The optacon is dead. Long live the Optacon.

Back in the day there was a way to route some bioses of some boxes
over a serial port--I believe the name of the product was Weasel or
similar--but there is no device I know of that works better for this
than an Optacon in the hands of a proficient user. Unfortunately, the
first sentence of this message is sadly applicable.

On 10/20/21, Brian Vogel <britechguy@gmail.com> wrote:
On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 07:32 PM, Arlene wrote:


I hope in the future blind users can go in there with Nairator.
-
Not likely.

What folks who use screen readers, as they currently exist, need to
understand is that they are application software.  Mind you, a very
specialized application, but still an application.  The operating system
(whether Windows or any other one) must be up and running at least to a
certain point before any screen reader can come online.

UEFI/BIOS occur in the boot sequence well prior to Windows (or other OSes
such as Linux) ever being kicked off for loading.  While it would be
conceivably possible to have a dedicated screen reader for that environment,
and if memory serves a prototype was once made, long ago, it certainly would
not be Narrator, NVDA, JAWS or any other screen reader as end users know
them.  And it would also very likely have commands strictly limited to the
environment at hand, which means it would be very different in that way,
too.

And, as you mention, even if you were to have a screen reader of some sort
available to navigate UEFI/BIOS, you still have to be very, very certain
that what you're doing is precisely what you intend to do and that what you
intend is actually what needs to be done to achieve the result hoped for.
 If you can have this certainty, then go for it, otherwise, get assistance.
And this is completely separate from your visual status.  Most of my sighted
clients have no idea that UEFI/BIOS even exists nor how to interact with
it.  It's just not something most end users ever need to touch.

As far as turning off "media keys" or whatever a maker might call the
actions associated with the function keys, lobbying them to create utilities
such as the one Lenovo already has that allow these to be turned on or off
from within Windows, or asking for some keyboard shortcut, likely a 4-key
press to avoid accidents, to do this are both better ideas than a screen
reader for UEFI/BIOS likely would be.  They're safer, too.

--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H1, Build 19043

*The ignorance of one voter in a democracy impairs the security of all.*

~ John F. Kennedy





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Arlene
 

I guess no matter what, we’ll always need sighted assistance in something to do with the computer’s BIOS.  I won’t even touch it. I’ll get a sighted person who knows what to do in the bios. 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: Jackie
Sent: October 20, 2021 5:05 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] what next

 

The optacon is dead. Long live the Optacon.

 

Back in the day there was a way to route some bioses of some boxes

over a serial port--I believe the name of the product was Weasel or

similar--but there is no device I know of that works better for this

than an Optacon in the hands of a proficient user. Unfortunately, the

first sentence of this message is sadly applicable.

 

On 10/20/21, Brian Vogel <britechguy@...> wrote:

> On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 07:32 PM, Arlene wrote:

>> 

>> I hope in the future blind users can go in there with Nairator.

> -

> Not likely.

> What folks who use screen readers, as they currently exist, need to

> understand is that they are application software.  Mind you, a very

> specialized application, but still an application.  The operating system

> (whether Windows or any other one) must be up and running at least to a

> certain point before any screen reader can come online.

> UEFI/BIOS occur in the boot sequence well prior to Windows (or other OSes

> such as Linux) ever being kicked off for loading.  While it would be

> conceivably possible to have a dedicated screen reader for that environment,

> and if memory serves a prototype was once made, long ago, it certainly would

> not be Narrator, NVDA, JAWS or any other screen reader as end users know

> them.  And it would also very likely have commands strictly limited to the

> environment at hand, which means it would be very different in that way,

> too.

> And, as you mention, even if you were to have a screen reader of some sort

> available to navigate UEFI/BIOS, you still have to be very, very certain

> that what you're doing is precisely what you intend to do and that what you

> intend is actually what needs to be done to achieve the result hoped for.

>  If you can have this certainty, then go for it, otherwise, get assistance.

> And this is completely separate from your visual status.  Most of my sighted

> clients have no idea that UEFI/BIOS even exists nor how to interact with

> it.  It's just not something most end users ever need to touch.

> As far as turning off "media keys" or whatever a maker might call the

> actions associated with the function keys, lobbying them to create utilities

> such as the one Lenovo already has that allow these to be turned on or off

> from within Windows, or asking for some keyboard shortcut, likely a 4-key

> press to avoid accidents, to do this are both better ideas than a screen

> reader for UEFI/BIOS likely would be.  They're safer, too.

> --

> Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H1, Build 19043

> *The ignorance of one voter in a democracy impairs the security of all.*

> ~ John F. Kennedy

>

 

 

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Subscribe to a WordPress for Newbies Mailing List by sending a message to:

wp4newbs-request@... with 'subscribe' in the Subject field OR by

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& check out my sites at www.brightstarsweb.com & www.mysitesbeenhacked.com

 

 

 

 

 


Rui Fontes
 

I normally manage to uninstall McAfee with the help of NVDA OCR...


Rui Fontes


Às 20:19 de 20/10/2021, Chris Mullins escreveu:

Hi Ken

You can also download a mcafee removal tool from the mcafee web site.  I do not know how accessible it is but it should get rid of the remaining components.

 

Cheers

Chris

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: Mohamed
Sent: 20 October 2021 19:45
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] what next

 

HP actually has a BIOS configuration utility that can be used to edit BIOS settings from within Windows. https://ftp.ext.hp.com/pub/caps-softpaq/cmit/HP_BCU.html. this is a command line app that allows you to configure BIOS settings by editing a text file. You'll need to generate a text file of your current BIOS settings, and disable the setting called Action Key Mode by removing the asterisk from enabled and moving it to disable.

On 10/20/2021 1:40 PM, ken lawrence via groups.io wrote:

Hi NVDA apparently BIOS is set this way in default the HP tech support says that BIOS is outside windows and therefore screen reader won’t work.  Will narrator work this way and if not can a blind user change this setting and regain use of function keys that way?  I’ve deleted more of the HP stuff on this machine and can’tcompletely get rid of inaccessible mcafee antivirus. Boy why do blind people have to fight these battles in 2021? 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

 


Sarah k Alawami
 

Actually under mac os I can access what they call the recovery assistant and even choose what disk I want to boot from, all of it talks btw. I love it. Iv’e made changes under the command line etc.

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Arlene
Sent: Wednesday, October 20, 2021 5:16 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] what next

 

I guess no matter what, we’ll always need sighted assistance in something to do with the computer’s BIOS.  I won’t even touch it. I’ll get a sighted person who knows what to do in the bios. 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: Jackie
Sent: October 20, 2021 5:05 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] what next

 

The optacon is dead. Long live the Optacon.

 

Back in the day there was a way to route some bioses of some boxes

over a serial port--I believe the name of the product was Weasel or

similar--but there is no device I know of that works better for this

than an Optacon in the hands of a proficient user. Unfortunately, the

first sentence of this message is sadly applicable.

 

On 10/20/21, Brian Vogel <britechguy@...> wrote:

> On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 07:32 PM, Arlene wrote:

>> 

>> I hope in the future blind users can go in there with Nairator.

> -

> Not likely.

> What folks who use screen readers, as they currently exist, need to

> understand is that they are application software.  Mind you, a very

> specialized application, but still an application.  The operating system

> (whether Windows or any other one) must be up and running at least to a

> certain point before any screen reader can come online.

> UEFI/BIOS occur in the boot sequence well prior to Windows (or other OSes

> such as Linux) ever being kicked off for loading.  While it would be

> conceivably possible to have a dedicated screen reader for that environment,

> and if memory serves a prototype was once made, long ago, it certainly would

> not be Narrator, NVDA, JAWS or any other screen reader as end users know

> them.  And it would also very likely have commands strictly limited to the

> environment at hand, which means it would be very different in that way,

> too.

> And, as you mention, even if you were to have a screen reader of some sort

> available to navigate UEFI/BIOS, you still have to be very, very certain

> that what you're doing is precisely what you intend to do and that what you

> intend is actually what needs to be done to achieve the result hoped for.

>  If you can have this certainty, then go for it, otherwise, get assistance.

> And this is completely separate from your visual status.  Most of my sighted

> clients have no idea that UEFI/BIOS even exists nor how to interact with

> it.  It's just not something most end users ever need to touch.

> As far as turning off "media keys" or whatever a maker might call the

> actions associated with the function keys, lobbying them to create utilities

> such as the one Lenovo already has that allow these to be turned on or off

> from within Windows, or asking for some keyboard shortcut, likely a 4-key

> press to avoid accidents, to do this are both better ideas than a screen

> reader for UEFI/BIOS likely would be.  They're safer, too.

> --

> Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H1, Build 19043

> *The ignorance of one voter in a democracy impairs the security of all.*

> ~ John F. Kennedy

>

 

 

--

Subscribe to a WordPress for Newbies Mailing List by sending a message to:

wp4newbs-request@... with 'subscribe' in the Subject field OR by

visiting the list page at http://www.freelists.org/list/wp4newbs

& check out my sites at www.brightstarsweb.com & www.mysitesbeenhacked.com

 

 

 

 

 


Arlene
 

Yes, that’s what I heard. With a Mac you can do that.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: Sarah k Alawami
Sent: October 20, 2021 7:12 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] what next

 

Actually under mac os I can access what they call the recovery assistant and even choose what disk I want to boot from, all of it talks btw. I love it. Iv’e made changes under the command line etc.

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Arlene
Sent: Wednesday, October 20, 2021 5:16 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] what next

 

I guess no matter what, we’ll always need sighted assistance in something to do with the computer’s BIOS.  I won’t even touch it. I’ll get a sighted person who knows what to do in the bios. 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: Jackie
Sent: October 20, 2021 5:05 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] what next

 

The optacon is dead. Long live the Optacon.

 

Back in the day there was a way to route some bioses of some boxes

over a serial port--I believe the name of the product was Weasel or

similar--but there is no device I know of that works better for this

than an Optacon in the hands of a proficient user. Unfortunately, the

first sentence of this message is sadly applicable.

 

On 10/20/21, Brian Vogel <britechguy@...> wrote:

> On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 07:32 PM, Arlene wrote:

>> 

>> I hope in the future blind users can go in there with Nairator.

> -

> Not likely.

> What folks who use screen readers, as they currently exist, need to

> understand is that they are application software.  Mind you, a very

> specialized application, but still an application.  The operating system

> (whether Windows or any other one) must be up and running at least to a

> certain point before any screen reader can come online.

> UEFI/BIOS occur in the boot sequence well prior to Windows (or other OSes

> such as Linux) ever being kicked off for loading.  While it would be

> conceivably possible to have a dedicated screen reader for that environment,

> and if memory serves a prototype was once made, long ago, it certainly would

> not be Narrator, NVDA, JAWS or any other screen reader as end users know

> them.  And it would also very likely have commands strictly limited to the

> environment at hand, which means it would be very different in that way,

> too.

> And, as you mention, even if you were to have a screen reader of some sort

> available to navigate UEFI/BIOS, you still have to be very, very certain

> that what you're doing is precisely what you intend to do and that what you

> intend is actually what needs to be done to achieve the result hoped for.

>  If you can have this certainty, then go for it, otherwise, get assistance.

> And this is completely separate from your visual status.  Most of my sighted

> clients have no idea that UEFI/BIOS even exists nor how to interact with

> it.  It's just not something most end users ever need to touch.

> As far as turning off "media keys" or whatever a maker might call the

> actions associated with the function keys, lobbying them to create utilities

> such as the one Lenovo already has that allow these to be turned on or off

> from within Windows, or asking for some keyboard shortcut, likely a 4-key

> press to avoid accidents, to do this are both better ideas than a screen

> reader for UEFI/BIOS likely would be.  They're safer, too.

> --

> Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H1, Build 19043

> *The ignorance of one voter in a democracy impairs the security of all.*

> ~ John F. Kennedy

>

 

 

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Sarah k Alawami
 

Maybe, just maybe, narrator will be able to do that as well, one day. Burt for now you need a sighted pair of eyes  or aira to help you.

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Arlene
Sent: Wednesday, October 20, 2021 7:19 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] what next

 

Yes, that’s what I heard. With a Mac you can do that.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: Sarah k Alawami
Sent: October 20, 2021 7:12 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] what next

 

Actually under mac os I can access what they call the recovery assistant and even choose what disk I want to boot from, all of it talks btw. I love it. Iv’e made changes under the command line etc.

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Arlene
Sent: Wednesday, October 20, 2021 5:16 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] what next

 

I guess no matter what, we’ll always need sighted assistance in something to do with the computer’s BIOS.  I won’t even touch it. I’ll get a sighted person who knows what to do in the bios. 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: Jackie
Sent: October 20, 2021 5:05 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] what next

 

The optacon is dead. Long live the Optacon.

 

Back in the day there was a way to route some bioses of some boxes

over a serial port--I believe the name of the product was Weasel or

similar--but there is no device I know of that works better for this

than an Optacon in the hands of a proficient user. Unfortunately, the

first sentence of this message is sadly applicable.

 

On 10/20/21, Brian Vogel <britechguy@...> wrote:

> On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 07:32 PM, Arlene wrote:

>> 

>> I hope in the future blind users can go in there with Nairator.

> -

> Not likely.

> What folks who use screen readers, as they currently exist, need to

> understand is that they are application software.  Mind you, a very

> specialized application, but still an application.  The operating system

> (whether Windows or any other one) must be up and running at least to a

> certain point before any screen reader can come online.

> UEFI/BIOS occur in the boot sequence well prior to Windows (or other OSes

> such as Linux) ever being kicked off for loading.  While it would be

> conceivably possible to have a dedicated screen reader for that environment,

> and if memory serves a prototype was once made, long ago, it certainly would

> not be Narrator, NVDA, JAWS or any other screen reader as end users know

> them.  And it would also very likely have commands strictly limited to the

> environment at hand, which means it would be very different in that way,

> too.

> And, as you mention, even if you were to have a screen reader of some sort

> available to navigate UEFI/BIOS, you still have to be very, very certain

> that what you're doing is precisely what you intend to do and that what you

> intend is actually what needs to be done to achieve the result hoped for.

>  If you can have this certainty, then go for it, otherwise, get assistance.

> And this is completely separate from your visual status.  Most of my sighted

> clients have no idea that UEFI/BIOS even exists nor how to interact with

> it.  It's just not something most end users ever need to touch.

> As far as turning off "media keys" or whatever a maker might call the

> actions associated with the function keys, lobbying them to create utilities

> such as the one Lenovo already has that allow these to be turned on or off

> from within Windows, or asking for some keyboard shortcut, likely a 4-key

> press to avoid accidents, to do this are both better ideas than a screen

> reader for UEFI/BIOS likely would be.  They're safer, too.

> --

> Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H1, Build 19043

> *The ignorance of one voter in a democracy impairs the security of all.*

> ~ John F. Kennedy

>

 

 

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Subscribe to a WordPress for Newbies Mailing List by sending a message to:

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visiting the list page at http://www.freelists.org/list/wp4newbs

& check out my sites at www.brightstarsweb.com & www.mysitesbeenhacked.com

 

 

 

 

 

 


dennis huckle
 

What a wonderful device it was.
Gave me pins and needles in my right index finger and buzzed like an angry wasp but brilliant device.
Kind regards,
Dennis huckle.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Jackie
Sent: 21 October 2021 01:05
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] what next

The optacon is dead. Long live the Optacon.

Back in the day there was a way to route some bioses of some boxes over a serial port--I believe the name of the product was Weasel or similar--but there is no device I know of that works better for this than an Optacon in the hands of a proficient user. Unfortunately, the first sentence of this message is sadly applicable.

On 10/20/21, Brian Vogel <britechguy@gmail.com> wrote:
On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 07:32 PM, Arlene wrote:


I hope in the future blind users can go in there with Nairator.
-
Not likely.

What folks who use screen readers, as they currently exist, need to
understand is that they are application software.  Mind you, a very
specialized application, but still an application.  The operating
system (whether Windows or any other one) must be up and running at
least to a certain point before any screen reader can come online.

UEFI/BIOS occur in the boot sequence well prior to Windows (or other
OSes such as Linux) ever being kicked off for loading.  While it would
be conceivably possible to have a dedicated screen reader for that
environment, and if memory serves a prototype was once made, long ago,
it certainly would not be Narrator, NVDA, JAWS or any other screen
reader as end users know them.  And it would also very likely have
commands strictly limited to the environment at hand, which means it
would be very different in that way, too.

And, as you mention, even if you were to have a screen reader of some
sort available to navigate UEFI/BIOS, you still have to be very, very
certain that what you're doing is precisely what you intend to do and
that what you intend is actually what needs to be done to achieve the result hoped for.
 If you can have this certainty, then go for it, otherwise, get assistance.
And this is completely separate from your visual status.  Most of my
sighted clients have no idea that UEFI/BIOS even exists nor how to
interact with it.  It's just not something most end users ever need to touch.

As far as turning off "media keys" or whatever a maker might call the
actions associated with the function keys, lobbying them to create
utilities such as the one Lenovo already has that allow these to be
turned on or off from within Windows, or asking for some keyboard
shortcut, likely a 4-key press to avoid accidents, to do this are both
better ideas than a screen reader for UEFI/BIOS likely would be.  They're safer, too.

--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H1, Build 19043

*The ignorance of one voter in a democracy impairs the security of
all.*

~ John F. Kennedy






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